Oatmeal Lattes Are Now A Thing

Your daily grind just got a whole lot more interesting. Oatmeal lattes are revamping your morning cup of joe to give you an all-in-one caffeine-fiber kick!

Oatmeal Lattes Are Now A Thing

Your daily grind just got a whole lot more interesting. Oatmeal lattes are revamping your morning cup of joe to give you an all-in-one caffeine-fiber kick!

These days, “easier,” “faster,” and “convenient” are the names of the game. Unfortunately, from fast food to processed snacks, this quick-paced American lifestyle has wreaked havoc on our bodies, making weight loss and scoring a lean body seem impossible. Thankfully, people are now getting creative and finding ways to mold healthy ideals to fit into their on-the-go lifestyle. The impossible, people, is being made possible. The newest creative, convenient idea to make its debut on the hasty-health scene is seriously genius; it’s called an oatmeal latte and it has some major perks.

The idea reportedly came from How Sweet It Is, a blog we often feature on many of our recipe lists (like this list of healthy sweet potato recipes)! So, how do you make an oatmeal latte? To prepare one, you simply cook your oats per usual and then whip in some steamed milk. If you’re on a no-dairy diet or scaling back, you can use almond or whatever non-dairy milk you’re using these days; just make sure it’s the unsweetened kind. Then, add a shot or two of espresso—and that’s it! The recipe calls for a little brown sugar and a pinch of salt, but we recommend ditching the sugar for a natural sweetener like coconut sugar (one of the best sweeteners for your health) or just simply drinking it black to cut calories and keep your energy levels steady all day.

All-in-one breakfast and coffee? We know you love it! But do you know what your body loves? Well, experts like us would say that we think your body will appreciate that the caffeine in the coffee boosts your metabolism and that the oats are high in fiber. According to a study in the journal Physiology & Behavior, those who drink caffeinated coffee in the morning have an average metabolic rate that is 16 percent higher than those who don’t. That’s a lot of all-day calorie burn. Plus, high-fiber foods boost your heart health and keep you fuller longer, ultimately helping you maintain or lose weight in the long run. Most handheld breakfasts (think Egg McMuffins or bagels) pack on the pounds, but these coffee oats are one mean mug of nutrition! This recipe is hands-down Eat This! approved, so we say give it a shot—a shot of espresso, that is. And for more smart oatmeal-inspired ideas, check out these 15 Awesome Ways to Lose Weight With Oatmeal.