Report

Man Does “Super Size Me” for Sugar, Gets Liver Disease

We all know desserts can be a diet killer; chocolate, ice cream, and soda are things we all know we should be avoiding (whether or not we follow through on that). But what about these sneaky diet saboteurs that we’re always talking about here at Eat This, Not That!?

Report

Man Does “Super Size Me” for Sugar, Gets Liver Disease

We all know desserts can be a diet killer; chocolate, ice cream, and soda are things we all know we should be avoiding (whether or not we follow through on that). But what about these sneaky diet saboteurs that we’re always talking about here at Eat This, Not That!?

A new film shines a big fat spotlight on “health” products like nutrition bars, fruit juices, and low-fat yogurts. That Sugar Film, an upcoming documentary from Australian filmmaker and TV actor Damon Gameau, is the sugar-based sequel to Morgan Spurlock’s groundbreaking film Super Size Me.

Gameau, who had been sugar-free prior to the filming of this documentary, committed to eating “healthy” low-fat food with high sugar content for 60 days. All those sweets we associate with sugar–candy bars, colas, cake–weren’t allowed. Within three weeks, he felt terrible. His daily sugar consumption, 40 teaspoons, was only slightly above the average intake of teenagers around the world. (For the record, the American Heart Association recommends no more than 6 teaspoons a day for women and 9 for men, noting the average American takes in 20 teaspoons daily.)

After the full 60 days, Gameau developed beginning signs of fatty liver disease, in addition to his bad moods, and packed on 4 inches of visceral belly fat—the really dangerous kind that wraps around your internal organs. What did his last meal on this dangerous diet look like? What you’ll find in a typical child’s lunchbox: fruit juice, a jam sandwich, and a snack bar.