News

Your Day in Health: April 11

When work and sleep conflict, which one wins?

News

Your Day in Health: April 11

When work and sleep conflict, which one wins?

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

EAT RIGHT RULE: Get breakfast at home. Having this meal out doubles your odds of obesity, says U of Mass study.

WSJ: How Flavor Drives Nutrition

"For nearly a half century, America has been on a witch hunt to find the ingredient that is making us fat. In the 1980s, the culprit was fat itself. Next it was carbs. Today, sugar is the enemy—unless you’re caught up in the war on gluten. And none of it has worked. Obesity is now closing in on smoking as our No. 1 preventable cause of death. The U.S. has rarely failed at anything the way it has failed at weight loss. Perhaps that is because we’re missing a crucial piece of the food puzzle. Oddly enough, all those diet gurus and bureaucrats hardly ever ask the simplest question: How does it taste? We’ve fixated on what food does inside the body, but we’ve almost totally ignored why it gets there in the first place. Even a child knows: We eat because food is delicious." Click here to read the full story.

NY TIMES: When Work and Sleep Conflict, Work Wins

"There are a lot of advantages to earning more money, but getting a good night’s sleep may not be one of them. It turns out that, in general, the more money people make, the less they sleep. That’s been true for decades in the United States, and in other countries as well. On average, adults earning the highest incomes—around $98,000 for a family of four—sleep 40 minutes less than people in the lowest-income families. And among short sleepers—those who are in the bottom 10 percent of nightly rest—high-income people are overrepresented, according to the government survey that sleep researchers trust most." Click here to read the full story.

SCIENCE DAILY: Rats Fed a Dietary Fiber Supplement Had Better Weight Control

"Rats fed a fiber supplement while on a high fat and high sugar diet show a much lower weight gain than those who did not eat the fiber, a study shows. A team of researchers says the study helps scientists better understand the mechanisms of weight control and energy balance." Click here to read the full story.