News

That Extra Cup of Coffee May Cut Your Cancer Risk

Go ahead, ask for the Venti.

News

That Extra Cup of Coffee May Cut Your Cancer Risk

Go ahead, ask for the Venti.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

Hungry? Grab a small handful of almonds or walnuts! The amino acid arginine–found in walnuts, almonds, Brazil nuts, brown rice and chicken–is a powerful flab-fryer. A 2014 Journal of Dietary Supplements study found that consuming nine grams of arginine a day can help reduce belly fat and weight in obese individuals.

WEB MD: Coffee May Lower Endometrial Cancer Risk

"Ladies, a heavy coffee habit might do more than perk you up. New research suggests it may also reduce your risk of endometrial cancer. Using data on more than 456,000 women from two large ongoing studies, researchers evaluated the dietary habits of more than 2,800 women diagnosed with cancer of the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. Compared to women who drank less than a cup a day, those who drank about four cups daily had an 18 percent lower risk of getting this cancer, they found." Click here to read the full story.

BBC: Dos and Don’ts for Restful Sleep

"Few experiences are as maddening as a restless night. Sleep should, in theory, be the most natural and effortless activity in the world, yet insomnia is common to many of us. To add to the frustration, it is now becoming clear that the hours you spend in bed are just as important to your physical and mental health as those spent walking, talking and eating." Click here to read the full story.

REUTERS: Blueberries May Help Control Blood Pressure

"Eating blueberries every day might improve borderline high blood pressure in middle-aged women, according to a small U.S. study. Women who ate freeze-dried blueberries for two months had lowered blood pressure and increased levels of a chemical that relaxes blood vessel walls." Click here to read the full story.

The Atlantic: Is Costco Making Us Fat?

"Here's a fact that shows just how quickly obesity has taken over America: In 1990, no state had an obesity prevalence of 15 percent or more. By 2010, no state was less than 20 percent obese. But what's driving the epidemic? We have no answers, only theories. Some studies say it's food deserts; others say it's desk jobs. Some even claim that it's the decline in smoking, since tobacco suppresses appetite. Along with three other researchers, Charles Courtemanche, an assistant professor of economics at Georgia State University, analyzed a number of these theories for a recent study." Click here to read the full story.