News

Meet the People Fighting for Your Right to Eat Pizza

The people fighting for your right to eat pizza, a new hormone mimics the effects of exercise and more.

pepperoni pizza
News

Meet the People Fighting for Your Right to Eat Pizza

The people fighting for your right to eat pizza, a new hormone mimics the effects of exercise and more.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

CRYSTAL CLEAR: You’re more likely to overeat small treats from transparent packages than from opaque ones. Out of sight, out of mouth!

SCIENCE DAILY: Newly Discovered Hormone Mimics the Effects of Exercise

"Scientists have discovered a new hormone that fights the weight gain caused by a high-fat Western diet and normalizes the metabolism — effects commonly associated with exercising. When tested in mice, the hormone blocked the negative health effects of eating a high-fat diet." Click here to read the full story.

BLOOMBERG: Inside the Powerful Lobby Fighting for Your Right to Eat Pizza

"There are 11,781 registered lobbyists in Washington, more than enough to represent even the most arcane special interests. The American Racing Pigeon Union has a lobbying firm to work on its behalf. So do the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute, the Owners of Ivory Miniatures, and the International Natural Sausage Casing Association. Within corporate America, food industry lobbyists represent particularly specific interests: Groups advocate for restaurants and frozen foods, franchise associations, and chains. Beef, dairy, corn, potatoes, and apples all have their champions. But there is nothing quite like the pizza lobby, a rare coalition of competitors who have banded together to advocate for a specific dish. There’s no sandwich lobby, no burrito trade association. The macaroni-and-cheese people have yet to get their act together." Click here to read the full story.

REUTERS: Large Breakfast, Small Dinner Tied to Better Diabetes Blood Sugar

"Big breakfasts and small dinners might be a healthier way to eat for people with type 2 diabetes, according to a small new study. Diabetics in the study who ate big breakfasts and small dinners had fewer episodes of high blood sugar than those who ate small breakfasts and large dinners, researchers found. Blood sugar—also known as blood glucose—is controlled by the body’s internal clock, with larger blood sugar peaks after evening meals, Dr. Daniela Jakubowicz told Reuters Health in an email." Click here to read the full story.

SCIENCE DAILY: Divorce Fuels Kids' Sugary Beverage Consumption, Study Finds

"Children of recently separated or divorced families are likelier to drink sugar-sweetened beverages than children in families where the parents are married, putting them at higher risk for obesity later in life, according to a new study. Maintaining family routines such as eating a regular dinner or carving out time to talk each day, however, can protect children during divorce against developing unhealthy eating habits." Click here to read the full story.