News

How Music Can Help Change Your Genes

How music can change how your gene expression, the smell of weight bias and more.

News

How Music Can Help Change Your Genes

How music can change how your gene expression, the smell of weight bias and more.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

INSTANT PORTION CONTROL: Eat your cereal from a coffee cup. (It’s easier to slurp the milk, too!)

Science Daily: From Soda Bans to Bike Lanes: Which 'natural Experiments' Really Reduce Obesity?

"Many public health researchers take advantage of 'natural experiments'—comparing people's calorie consumption or physical activity levels, either before and after a policy or environmental change, or in contrast to a similar group of people not affected by that change. But not all natural experiments are created equal. A public health team has now systematically reviewed the state of the science." Click here to read the full story.

Huffington Post: Using Music to Help Change Your Genes

"That song you can't get out of your head might be doing something more than prompting you to hum the tune, according to a new scientific study on genes and music. The study found that one of the genes that is turned on (or—in biological jargon—"expressed") when listening to music is called SNCA (synuclein-alpha) and it is involved in the secretion and transport of dopamine. Dopamine is your "go-get-em" neurotransmitter, providing that jolt of motivation that helps you learn a new language, get yourself to the gym, break a bad habit, get out of bed when you'd rather be hitting the snooze button, or choose a healthy snack instead of a Twinkie." Click here to read the full story.

Science Daily: How Does Weight Stigma Smell? Sense of Smell May Reveal Weight Bias

"Could our reaction to an image of an overweight or obese person affect how we perceive odor? A trio of researchers says yes. The researchers discovered that visual cues associated with overweight or obese people can influence one's sense of smell, and that the perceiver's body mass index matters, too. Participants with higher BMI tended to be more critical of heavier people, with higher-BMI participants giving scents a lower rating when scent samples were matched with an obese or overweight individual." Click here to read the full story.