News

Experiment Reveals Junk Food’s Harm to Gut

Experiment reveals junk food's harm to the gut, the waist-widening effect of keeping food visible throughout the house and more.

News

Experiment Reveals Junk Food’s Harm to Gut

Experiment reveals junk food's harm to the gut, the waist-widening effect of keeping food visible throughout the house and more.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

LETTUCE HELP YOU! Half a head of this lettuce has more alpha-carotene, a disease-fighting antioxidant, than either romaine or spinach.

SCIENCE DAILY: Cardiorespiratory Fitness Contributes to Successful Brain Aging

"Cardiorespiratory fitness may positively impact the structure of white matter in the brains of older adults. These results suggest that exercise could be prescribed to lessen age-related declines in brain structure." Click here to read the full story.

BBC: Diet Swap Experiment Reveals Junk Food’s Harm to Gut

"A two-week diet swap experiment hints at just how damaging a Western diet might be to our guts. Researchers asked people to switch diets for two weeks – 20 US volunteers moved to a low-fat, high-fibre diet while 20 volunteers from rural Africa were asked to eat more 'junk' food. Although the swap was brief, its impact was visible, Nature Communication says." Click here to read the full story.

SCIENCE DAILY: Healthy Children’s Menu Items Tied to Healthier Ordering Patterns, Sustained Restaurant Revenue

"The first study of its kind evaluating ordering patterns of children’s meals when provided with healthier menu items and changes in restaurant revenues shows potential for both improved children’s health and restaurant growth. This study shows promise for other restaurateurs looking to promote healthy eating among children while remaining competitive in the marketplace." Click here to read the full story.

SCIENCE DAILY: Keeping Food Visible Throughout The House is Linked to Obesity

"Researchers have identified two seemingly unrelated but strong predictors of obesity: having low self-esteem related to one’s weight, and keeping food visibly available around the house, outside the kitchen. The study focused primarily on determining whether the home environment – architectural features and food storage and availability – was associated with obesity, but also measured a number of psychological factors. While architectural features had no relationship to obesity status, several food-related findings did." Click here to read the full story.