News

Fructose May Increase Cravings for High-Calorie Foods

Researchers find a new way to target obesity, the unexpected side effect of eating fruit and more.

Fructose May Increase Cravings for High-Calorie Foods
News

Fructose May Increase Cravings for High-Calorie Foods

Researchers find a new way to target obesity, the unexpected side effect of eating fruit and more.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

JUICY FACT: OJ with pulp contains 30% more anti-inflammatory flavonoids & cancer-fighters than strained (no-pulp) type.

NY TIMES: Fructose May Increase Cravings for High-Calorie Foods

"The type of sugar you eat may affect your cravings for high-calorie foods, researchers report. An experiment with 24 healthy volunteers found that compared with consuming glucose, consuming fructose—the sugar found in fruits, honey and corn syrup—resulted in more activity in the brain’s reward regions, increased responses to images of food and a tendency to choose eating a high-calorie food over a future monetary reward." Click here to read the full story.

SCIENCE DAILY: Study Finds Novel Way to Target Brown Fat Regulation to Reduce Obesity

"A new way that brown fat, a potential obesity-fighting target, is regulated in the body has been discovered by researchers.. This finding gives researchers and weight-loss companies a possible therapeutic target for obesity." Click here to read the full story.

YAHOO: People Unaware of Skin Cancer Risks, UK Study Finds

"A new study from the British Association of Dermatologists, published Monday, highlights that 96% of UK adults fail to check themselves regularly for skin cancer and that 77% wouldn't be able to recognize signs of the disease. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the UK. Rates have been rising steadily since 1960 and currently 250,000 new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer are diagnosed annually." Click here to read the full story.

SCIENCE DAILY: Lifetime Intense Physical Activity May Lower Risk for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

"Performing vigorous physical activity over one's lifetime may lower risk for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Because not much is known about what causes non-Hodgkin lymphoma, identifying risk factors is particularly important for the prevention and control of this cancer, the main researcher noted." Click here to read the full story.