News

Your Day in Health: August 10

Coca-cola funding scientists who want you to worry less about cutting calories, and more of your daily health news.

News

Your Day in Health: August 10

Coca-cola funding scientists who want you to worry less about cutting calories, and more of your daily health news.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

99 PROBLEMS: For 100 calories, you can eat 4.5 Hershey's Kisses, 29 M&Ms, 23 Skittles, 9 Whoppers, 8 Dots, 5 Starbursts, or 4 Tootsie Rolls.

NY TIMES: Coca-Cola Funds Scientists Who Shift Blame for Obesity Away From Bad Diets

"Coca-Cola, the world’s largest producer of sugary beverages, is backing a new “science-based” solution to the obesity crisis: To maintain a healthy weight, get more exercise and worry less about cutting calories. The beverage giant has teamed up with influential scientists who are advancing this message in medical journals, at conferences and through social media. To help the scientists get the word out, Coke has provided financial and logistical support to a new nonprofit organization called the Global Energy Balance Network, which promotes the argument that weight-conscious Americans are overly fixated on how much they eat and drink while not paying enough attention to exercise." Read the full story.

WSJ: Pepsi Starts Shipping Aspartame-Free Soda

"PepsiCo Inc. embarked on a gamble when it said it would change the recipe for Diet Pepsi to exclude aspartame, pointing to public concern over the artificial sweetener. Now, the soda giant is about to find out whether consumers find sucralose and acesulfame potassium more palatable. The new version of the diet soda, which goes on sale nationwide next week, ditches what has been the soft drink industry’s go-to diet sweetener for decades in favor of sweeteners that are also known as Splenda and Ace K. But while the alternatives haven’t sparked the same controversy, they’re also artificial. Some marketing experts wonder whether the swap will make much difference in reversing slumping sales of Diet Pepsi, or turn off die-hard loyalists." Read the full story.

NY TIMES: ‘Body’ Report Cards Aren’t Influencing Arkansas Teenagers

"It is one of the boldest and most controversial tactics in the battle against childhood obesity: A growing number of schools are monitoring their students’ weight and sending updates home, much like report cards. Ten states, including Ohio, Pennsylvania and Illinois, now require schools to send such notifications, sometimes called 'B.M.I. letters,' or less charitably 'fat letters.' But a new study of the first state to adopt the practice shows that the letters have had almost no effect, at least on older teenagers. The disappointing results not only raise questions about the efficacy of the letters but highlight the challenges schools face more generally in addressing adolescent obesity." Read the full story.

NPR: Disgust Diet: Can You Train Your Brain To Recoil At High-Calorie Foods?

"A psychologist says there could be a simple way to make calorie-packed foods like french fries or ice cream seem unappealing, even a bit disgusting. Others are less sure." Read the full story.