News

Your Day in Health: August 31

Meet the newest vegetable developed by Monsanto, and more of your daily health news.

News

Your Day in Health: August 31

Meet the newest vegetable developed by Monsanto, and more of your daily health news.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

EAT RIGHT RULE: You burn more calories digesting protein than fats or carbs.

SCIENCE DAILY: Food May Be Addictive: Food Craving May Be ‘Hard-Wired’ In The Brain

"An international group of researchers have found that food craving activates different brain networks between obese and normal weight patients. This indicates that the tendency to want food may be ‘hard-wired’ into the brain of overweight patients, becoming a functional brain biomarker." Read the full story.

REUTERS: Sleep-Deprived Kids Are More Tempted By Food

"Children who don’t get enough sleep might be more tempted by food, a new study suggests. Five-year-olds who slept less than 11 hours a night were more eager to eat at the sight or reminder of a favorite snack, compared to those who slept longer, researchers reported in the International Journal of Obesity. The children who slept less than 11 hours at night also had a higher body mass index – a measure of weight in relation to height – than those who slept 11 hours or more." Read the full story.

QUARTZ: Monsanto’s Super-Broccoli Shouldn’t Scare You, But Its Plans For Global Vegetable Domination Might

"Broccoli, the original superfood, is getting an upgrade. On top of the Vitamin C, Vitamin K, protein, dietary fiber, and slew of other nutrients found in a typical stalk of broccoli, Monsanto says its Beneforté broccoli will do you even better. It’s bred to have higher levels of a nutrient that your body uses to fight cancer and cholesterol. As Monsanto’s website for the super-broccoli puts it, 'Beneforté is even more of a good thing.' Beneforté is no pet project. Since 2005, Monsanto has spent more than $2 billion acquiring two major vegetable and fruit seed companies." Read the full story.

REUTERS: Healthy Workplace Tied To Fewer Obese Young Workers

"Workplaces that encourage healthy lifestyle practices are tied to fewer obese employees among millennials, according to a new study. About 17 percent of young employees in workplaces that encouraged several healthy lifestyle practices were obese, compared to about 24 percent in spaces that promoted one or no healthy practices, researchers found." Read the full story.