News

Your Day in Health: July 9

High-fat diets actually mess with your gut, brain and appetite, and more of your daily health news.

News

Your Day in Health: July 9

High-fat diets actually mess with your gut, brain and appetite, and more of your daily health news.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

EAT RIGHT RULE: Limit your eating to just 8 hours during your non-sleeping hours and watch the pounds disappear.

SCIENCE DAILY: High Fat Diet Changes Gut Microbe Populations And Brain’s Ability To Recognize Fullness

"Have you ever wondered why eating one good-tasting French fry may lead you to eat the whole batch and leave you wanting more? According to a new study with rats, that high-fat indulgence literally changes the populations of bacteria residing inside the gut and also alters the signaling to the brain. The result? The brain no longer senses signals for fullness, which can cause overeating—a leading cause of obesity." Read the full story.

REUTERS: Healthier Meals Do Cost Families More

"Shopping for healthier groceries, like whole wheat bread instead of white bread and lean meat instead of fattier cuts, would cost a family of four about $1,500 more a year at their regular stores, according to a new U.S. study." Read the full story.

THE ATLANTIC: Better Keep Plastic Out Of The Microwave

"It might be easier to just microwave leftovers in the plastic container you left them in, but new studies suggest you might want to invest the time to wash an extra dish. Zapping a burrito in a plastic wrapper, or storing food in plastic containers that have been washed in the dishwasher, could increase the likelihood that you’ll ingest phthalates, a group of chemicals used in some plastics." Read the full story.

NY TIMES: Diabetes Takes A Toll On The Brain

"Having Type 2 diabetes is associated with greater impairment of blood flow to the brain and a sharper decline in mental acuity. At the end of two years, people with diabetes had greater declines in gray matter volume, composite scores on mental tests, and in rates of blood flow to the brain than those in the control group. They also had greater increases in blood measures of inflammation. Among the group with diabetes, those with more severe declines in cerebral blood flow had correspondingly greater declines on tests of mental skills." Read the full story.