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Diet vs. Exercise: Which Is Best for Weight Loss?

What's more important for weight loss: eating less or working out more. Find out here.

Diet vs. Exercise: Which Is Best for Weight Loss?
News

Diet vs. Exercise: Which Is Best for Weight Loss?

What's more important for weight loss: eating less or working out more. Find out here.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

EAT RIGHT RULE: Granola deserves an Oscar for convincing us it’s #healthy. One cup is 400+ cals of mostly sugar and fat.

NY TIMES: To Lose Weight, Eating Less Is Far More Important Than Exercising More

"One of my family’s favorite shows is 'The Biggest Loser.' Although some viewers don’t appreciate how it pushes people so hard to lose weight, the show probably inspires some overweight people to regain control of their lives. But one of the most frustrating parts of the show, at least for me, is its overwhelming emphasis on exercise. Because when it comes to reaching a healthy weight, what you don’t eat is much, much more important." Read the full story.

WSJ: When to Keep Fitness Goals A Secret

"Facebook is a popular site for people to share personal-fitness goals. But a recent study found publicizing the goals on social media doesn’t lead to a significant increase in exercising. Sharing weekly exercise goals on Facebook often brought an outpouring of support from friends and family, the study found. But people who used the social-media site were less likely to set goals in the first place than others who kept their commitments to themselves. And while people who went public with their goals exercised a bit more than those who kept private, the difference wasn’t statistically significant." Read the full story.

AFP: Chocolate May Be Good For Your Heart, Study Suggests

"New research has added to tentative evidence that eating chocolate in modest quantities may be good for the heart, scientists said on Tuesday. Scientists in Britain looked at data from nearly 21,000 people who filled out questionnaires about their lifestyle, and had their health monitored for more than 11 years. Their average daily consumption was seven grams (0.25 ounces) of chocolate, ranging from none to 100g. The top fifth of chocolate-eaters were 12 percent less likely to develop heart disease and 23 percent less likely to suffer a stroke compared to the bottom fifth of consumers, the researchers found." Read the full story.