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Your Day in Health: November 10

Bad news for skinny people with belly fat. Plus, more of today's essential health news.

Your Day in Health: November 10
News

Your Day in Health: November 10

Bad news for skinny people with belly fat. Plus, more of today's essential health news.

MEDICAL DAILY: Thin People With Belly Fat Are Worse Off Than Obese In Mortality Risk

“The fat around our waists may foretell our fate more accurately than our overall body mass index (BMI). At least, that's the conclusion reached by new research published Tuesday in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Researchers found that supposedly skinny adults with elevated levels of abdominal fat had a greater risk of mortality than overweight or obese individuals whose fat was distributed normally across their body. These skinny spare tires were also considered the worst off in terms of longterm survival compared to anyone else.” Read full story.

BLAST BELLY FAT NOW with these 33 Lazy Ways to Flatten Your Belly — Fast!

NY TIMES: FDA Recommends Daily Limit on Sugar

“Health experts have been nudging Americans to kick the sugar habit for years, and now it’s official: The Food and Drug Administration is recommending a daily cap on sugar for the first time. The goal is for Americans to limit added sugar to no more than 10 percent of daily calories, according to the proposed guidelines. For someone older than 3, that means eating no more than 12.5 teaspoons, or 50 grams, of it a day.” Read full story.

What's your daily limit? Check out What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Sugar!

SCIENCE DAILY: Just One Energy Drink May Boost Heart Disease Risk In Young Adults

“Drinking one 16-ounce energy drink boosts blood pressure and stress hormone responses in young, healthy adults, according to a new study. These changes could conceivably trigger new cardiovascular events.” Read full story.

SCIENCE DAILY: VANILLA YOGURT MAKES US FEEL HAPPY

“Foods that are more—or less—delicious than we expect can also cause mood changes. We all know what it's like to take a bite of something expecting one taste and getting another— it can be an enjoyable or disgusting experience. New research reveals that being pleasantly surprised or disappointed with a food product can actually change a person's mood.” Read full story.