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Your Day in Health: November 20

The FDA says this GMO food is safe to eat, but some groups aren't convinced. Plus, more of today's essential health news.

Your Day in Health: November 20
News

Your Day in Health: November 20

The FDA says this GMO food is safe to eat, but some groups aren't convinced. Plus, more of today's essential health news.

NPR: Genetically Modified Salmon Is Safe To Eat, FDA Says

"A kind of salmon that's been genetically modified so that it grows faster may be on the way to a supermarket near you. The Food and Drug Administration approved the fish on Thursday — a decision that environmental and food-safety groups are vowing to fight." Read full story.

ATLANTIC: THE ALGORITHM THAT CREATES DIETS THAT WORK FOR YOU

"Eran Elinav and Eran Segal from the Weizmann Institute of Science have developed a way of embracing that variability. By comprehensively monitoring the blood sugar, diets, and other traits of 800 people, they built an algorithm that can accurately predict how a person's blood-sugar levels will spike after eating any given meal.

They also used these personalized predictions to develop tailored dietary plans for keeping blood sugar in check. These plans sometimes included unconventional items like chocolate and ice-cream, and were so counter-intuitive that they baffled both the participants and dieticians involved in the study. But they seemed to work when assessed in a clinical trial, and they hint at a future when individuals will get personalized dietary recommendations, rather than hewing to universal guidelines." Read full story.

REUTERS: One In Two Healthy Adults Will Develop Pre-Diabetic Blood Sugar

"Almost half of 45-year-olds will develop so-called prediabetes, an elevated blood sugar level that often precedes diabetes, according to a large study from The Netherlands using population estimates." Read full story.

NY TIMES: The Limits of 'Intuitive' Eating

"People hate counting and cutting calories. That unsurprising fact is behind the rise of ‘‘intuitive’’ eating, an approach that de-emphasizes dieting in favor of attending to bodily signals, like feelings of hunger and, more important, fullness. A recent study offers one of the first head-to-head comparisons of the effectiveness of calorie restriction and intuitive eating."
http://nyti.ms/1Mqyq6Q