News

Your Day in Health: November 3

What happens to your body after just one junk-food snack. Plus, more bad news about red meat and more of today's essential health news.

woman snacking
News

Your Day in Health: November 3

What happens to your body after just one junk-food snack. Plus, more bad news about red meat and more of today's essential health news.

YAHOO: Eating Red Meat Twice Weekly May Up Cancer Risk Nearly 20%

“Days after the World Health Organization classified red meat as a probable human carcinogen, new research has strengthened the link between red meat consumption and cancer. A University of Oxford study discovered that participants who ate four servings of red meat a week were 42 percent more likely to develop colorectal cancer than those who had one serving or none at all. Participants who ate red meat at least twice a week were 18 percent more likely to develop colorectal cancer than vegetarians.“ Read full story.

Considering putting red meat back on the shelf? Check out our list of the Best Vegetarian Sources of Protein!

SCIENCE DAILY: Even A Little Is Too Much: One Junk Food Snack Triggers Signals Of Metabolic Disease

“We hate to ruin Thanksgiving, but a new report appearing in the Nov. 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that for some people, overindulgence at the dinner table or at snack time is enough to trigger signs of metabolic disease. Specifically, in some people just one high-calorie shake was enough to make people with metabolic disease worse, while in others, relatively short periods of overeating trigger the beginnings of metabolic disease. This information could be particularly useful for health care providers, nutritionists, and others who counsel people on disease prevention and eating habits.” Read full story.

NPR: Move Over, Yellow 6. More Natural Colors From Plants Are Coming

“From purple carrots and cabbage to grapes, the food industry is finding new ways to derive natural colors from plants. It's happening just as consumers are pushing Big Food to ditch artificial colors.’ Read full story.

REUTERS: Menus With Calorie Info May Not Change Long Term Habits

“Knowing how many calories are in a fast food chain's hamburger may not change people's eating habits, suggests a new study. New Yorkers exposed to calorie counts on fast food menus for years haven't changed how much or how often they eat at popular fast food restaurants, researchers report in Health Affairs.” Read full story.