News

Panera Bread’s Big Menu Change for 2020

Scientists say one night of bad sleep could equal six months on a high-fat diet. See how.

News

Panera Bread’s Big Menu Change for 2020

Scientists say one night of bad sleep could equal six months on a high-fat diet. See how.

SCIENCE DAILY: One Night of Poor Sleep Could Equal Six Months on a High-fat Diet

“New research finds that one night of sleep deprivation and six months on a high-fat diet could both impair insulin sensitivity to a similar degree, demonstrating the importance of a good night's sleep on health. This study used a canine model to examine whether sleep deprivation and a high-fat diet affect insulin sensitivity in similar ways.” Read full story.

If that isn’t reason enough to get sufficient shut-eye, check out these 20 Surprising Ways to Lose Weight in Your Sleep!

REUTERS: PANERA MOVING TO CAGE-FREE EGGS BY 2020

“Bakery-cafe chain Panera Bread Co will stop using eggs laid by caged hens by 2020, following similar moves from McDonald's Corp and other large U.S. restaurant chains. Thursday's egg announcement applies to the company's U.S. Panera Bread and St. Louis Bread restaurants. It covers Panera's annual supply of roughly 120 million shell eggs, hard boiled and liquid egg whites in addition to those used in sweets, soufflés and dressings.” Read full story.

See which meals diet experts order at Panera to lose weight fast!

YAHOO: The World’s Heaviest Countries

“Analysts predict that 50 percent of American adults will be obese by 2030. Though the U.S. is particularly infamous for its less-than-athletic population, obesity now plagues many of the world’s countries. In developing nations, the ill-effects of obesity take a particularly high toll. Obese citizens are more prone to chronic illness, thus hindering their productivity and causing undue stress on the country’s economy and health systems.” Read full story.

SCIENCE DAILY: Connections Discovered Between Masculinity, Energy Drink Use, And Sleep Problems

“Energy drinks have grown in popularity for many Americans, but there is growing concern about the health risks of consuming them in large quantities. Because men are the main consumers of energy drinks, a research team set out to study a possible link between masculinity, expectations about the benefits of consuming energy drinks, how those expectations affect energy drink use, and the impact on sleep.” Read full story.