News

Your Day in Health: September 2

The scary link between carbonated beverages and your heart health, and more of your daily health news.

Your Day in Health: September 2
News

Your Day in Health: September 2

The scary link between carbonated beverages and your heart health, and more of your daily health news.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

GOT CHOCOLATE MILK? A study found that chocolate milk is 40% more effective at repairing muscles after exercise than plain milk!

YAHOO: Study Points To Association Between Carbonated Drinks And Heart Attacks

"Limiting consumption of carbonated beverages could be beneficial for health according to a study involving 800,000 patients that associated the bubbly drinks with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of cardiac origin. It's not the first study to find fault with soft drinks, as epidemiological research has shown positive correlations between them and the occurrence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke, according to principal investigator Professor Keijiro Saku of Fukuoka University in Japan. 'Carbonated beverages, or sodas, have frequently been demonstrated to increase the risk of metabolic syndrome and CVD, such as subclinical cardiac remodeling and stroke,' says Professor Saku." Read the full story.

ADWEEK: McDonald's Finally Caves: All-Day Breakfast Is Coming Nationwide This Fall

"If there's one thing McDonald's customers have been begging for it's all-day breakfast. The fast-food giant teased people earlier this year by testing the concept at select locations in California. But now, with those tests almost over, all-day breakfast will roll out nationwide on Oct. 6, according to McDonald's spokeswoman Lisa McComb." Read the full story.

AP: Young At Heart? Not Most Americans, Government Report Says

"Your heart might be older than you are. A new government report suggests age is just a number — and perhaps not a very telling one when it comes to your risk of heart attack or stroke." Read the full story.

REUTERS: Activity Trackers Vary In Accuracy

"Wrist-worn activity trackers, increasingly popular among consumers and in healthcare research, can vary considerably in their accuracy, a study from Iowa State University suggests." Read the full story.