Report

You’re Going to Love What Science Says Can Boost Immunity

When it comes to boozing and your body, it's all about the numbers—and, no, we're not going to re-teach you how to calculate your BAC. At the right level, drinking can enhance the effects of vaccines, boosting your immunity and fighting infection, according to a study published in the journal Vaccine.

You’re Going to Love What Science Says Can Boost Immunity
Report

You’re Going to Love What Science Says Can Boost Immunity

When it comes to boozing and your body, it's all about the numbers—and, no, we're not going to re-teach you how to calculate your BAC. At the right level, drinking can enhance the effects of vaccines, boosting your immunity and fighting infection, according to a study published in the journal Vaccine.

Already have a glass of wine with dinner a couple nights a week? That could work in your favor this winter. After giving 12 rhesus macaques small pox vaccines and gauging their response, the researchers trained the monkeys to imbibe on their own and gave them access to either 4 percent ethanol or sugar water with the same amount of calories (the control group). They tracked the monkeys' alcohol consumption for 14 months, vaccinating them again after the first seven months. Though the monkeys all responded to the first vaccine similarly, the moderate drinkers of the test group saw increased vaccine response than both the non-drinkers and heavy drinkers after the second.

Those that tossed back the most ethanol, on the other hand, had a weakened immune system. In fact, a recent study confirmed the immune system distruption caused by large amounts of alcohol in young adults. Keep your cocktail consumption moderate and you can feel smug knowing your drink of choice is keeping those winter illnesses at bay.