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These are the 6 Types of Coronavirus You Could Have, Study Shows

Each is symptom specific and varies in severity.
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Fever, dry cough, loss of sense of smell and taste: Over the last several months these have been identified as the most common symptoms of COVID-19. However, many coronavirus sufferers experience a wide range of symptoms, ranging from headaches and fatigue to even confusion and shortness of breath. Researchers from King's College London, in a new study, accumulated data from around 1,600 coronavirus patients in the United States and United Kingdom who used the COVID Symptom Tracker App in March and April to log their symptoms to determine which symptoms tended to appear together and how they related to the progression of the virus. 

These are the six clusters of symptoms they identified:

1

Flu-Like With No Fever

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Headache, loss of smell, muscle pains, cough, sore throat, chest pain, no fever. Patients who fall into this milder category have a 1.5% chance of needing breathing support such as oxygen or a ventilator and only only 16% required hospitalization.

2

Flu-Like With Fever

Woman being sick having flu lying on sofa looking at temperature on thermometer.
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Headache, loss of smell, cough, sore throat, hoarseness, fever, loss of appetite. About 4.4% of patients at this level needed breathing support.

3

Gastrointestinal

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Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, diarrhea, sore throat, chest pain, no cough. Only 3.3% needed breathing support.

RELATED: Dr. Fauci's 10 Places You're Most Likely to Catch Coronavirus

4

Severe Level One, Fatigue

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Headache, loss of smell, cough, fever, hoarseness, chest pain, fatigue. Patients at this level needed breathing support at a rate of 8.6%. Patients in this "severe cluster" also tended to be older or with pre-exisiting conditions (such as diabetes or lung disease), obesity, or weakened immune systems.

5

Severe Level Two, Confusion

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Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, cough, fever, hoarseness, sore throat, chest pain, fatigue, confusion, muscle pain. About 10% of patients at this level needed breathing support. Patients in the severe clusters also tended to be older or with pre-exisiting conditions (such as diabetes or lung disease), obesity, or weakened immune systems.

6

Severe Level Three, Abdominal and Respiratory

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Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, cough, fever, hoarseness, sore throat, chest pain, fatigue, confusion, muscle pain, shortness of breath, diarrhea, abdominal pain. Nearly 20% of these patients need breathing support and nearly half of the patients with type six required hospitalization. Again, people in this "severe" cluster were more likely to be older or with pre-existing conditions (such as diabetes or lung disease), obesity, or weakened immune systems.

7

The Significance of These Findings

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"These findings have important implications for care and monitoring of people who are most vulnerable to severe COVID-19," Dr. Claire Steves from King's College London explained in an accompanying press release. "If you can predict who these people are at day five, you have time to give them support and early interventions such as monitoring blood oxygen and sugar levels, and ensuring they are properly hydrated—simple care that could be given at home, preventing hospitalizations and saving lives." As for yourself, don't miss this essential report: 21 Subtle Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus.

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