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Guinness Just Recalled This Drink Two Weeks After Its Debut

The company’s newest beer, Guinness 0.0, has a microbiological contamination, the company says.
8 poured guinness in 8 glasses

"We wanted to let you know that as a precautionary measure we are recalling Guinness 0.0 in Great Britain because of a microbiological contamination which may make some cans of Guinness 0.0 unsafe to consume," begins Gunniess's most recent press release. On October 26, Guinness proudly announced its Guinness 0.0 beer, the non-alcoholic version of the company's classic stout. Now, just weeks later, Guinness is recalling it.

"Guinness has always had an unwavering commitment to quality and our entire brewing team is hugely proud of the care and effort that has been put into the four year development process for Guinness 0.0.," said Aisling Ryan, a Guinness "Innovation Brewer," when the beer was first announced. Well, seems like that commitment to quality may have wavered. It's not a great look for Guinness, messing up a product that was supposed to make the company more inclusive and accessible. (Related: The 100 Unhealthiest Foods on the Planet.)

According to the UK Food Standards Agency, the cans were recalled "due to the possible presence of mould in the products." The recall affects customers in Great Britain and Ireland where Guinness 0.0 was released. Americans don't need to worry—the stout wasn't going to be rolled out worldwide until 2021.

Guinness promises that no other products were affected. The contamination occurred during the beer's manufacturing stage, and the company explains that Guinness 0.0 is made differently from their other products. They're working with distributors to remove the stout from the shelves. In the meantime, customers who've purchased the drink can return their cans for a full refund.

No word from Guinness or the Food Standards Agency about what customers who've already consumed Guinness 0.0 should do, though the FSA does offer the weak reassurance that "mold does not usually cause food poisoning."

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Clara Olshansky
Freelancer writer for Eat This, Not That! Read more