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Your Health Checklist at Any Age

Tick these boxes to protect your ticker—and your life.
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When you're young, you think you'll live forever. When you're old, you wish you'd taken better care of your health. This story is for all ages. A crucial step towards staying fit forever is to be informed about what routine tests and preventative care you should get at every age, and how often. We consulted the experts—including the American Heart Association, the American Diabetes Association, the American Cancer Society and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—for the latest official recommendations.

1

20s and 30s

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You feel invincible at this age. That's exactly why you should pay attention to this story. A few quick tests and vaccines can ensure you stay as fit as you feel. Click ahead to take a look.

2

20s and 30s: Check-Up

Professional doctor wearing white coat is checking woman patient with stethoscope and measure blood pressure in hospital background
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Get a regular check-up. Some studies suggest that annual physical exams may not be necessary. Ask your doctor what's right for you, and check in at least once a year.

3

20s and 30s: Flu

Doctor vaccinating male patient in clinic
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Get a flu shot every year.

4

20s and 30s: Blood Pressure

Doctor's Hand Measuring Blood Pressure Of Male Patient.
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Have your blood pressure checked every two to three years, unless you have risk factors and should be tested more often.

5

20s and 30s: Cholesterol

medical device for measuring cholesterol with stethoscope on the table.
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Have your cholesterol and related factors for heart disease checked every four to six years.

6

20s and 30s: Diabetes

Hematocrit blood test in check up.
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If you have risk factors for diabetes or prediabetes, be tested regularly (ask your doctor what's optimal).

7

20s and 30s: Pap Test

Vaginal Smear. Close up.
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Women between ages 21 and 29 should have a Pap test every three years. Women between 30 and 39 should have a Pap test and HPV test every five years.

8

20s and 30s: STD Testing

STD test blood analysis collection tube selected by technician
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Talk with your doctor about your risk factors for STDs and whether you should be screened regularly.

9

20s and 30s: Tetanus

Doctor gives an intramuscular injection tetanus vaccine in male arm.
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Get a tetanus booster shot every 10 years.

10

20s and 30s: Tdap

Healthcare concept with a hand in blue medical gloves holding Tap, tetanus, diptheria, and pertussis, vaccine vial
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Have a booster shot for tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (Tdap) every 10 years.

11

20s and 30s: HPV

Human Papilloma Virus vaccine with syringe and vial on white counter top
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If you're age 26 or younger, get the HPV vaccine if you haven't been previously immunized.

12

20s and 30s: Additional Vaccines

patient consulting with doctor on tablet
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Ask your doctor whether additional vaccines (such as hepatitis A and B, varicella and meningococcal disease) are right for you.

13

20s and 30s: Alcohol and Tobacco

Group of friends having drinks at nightclub.
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Talk with your doctor about your alcohol consumption and tobacco use.

14

20s and 30s: Exercise

group of women doing stretching exercises before intensive workout in spacious fitness studio
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Get at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise five days a week, with two days of strength training weekly.

15

40s and 50s

Portrait Of Mature Men Giving Women Piggy Backs.
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This is the age where you still feel young—but your body disagrees. You get injured more, your metabolism slows, and you start to feel like once you've solved one little health problem, another appears. Click ahead, follow the advice, and you should be able to see the doctor less.

16

40s and 50s: Check-Up

Woman talking to doctor
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Get a regular check-up, according to your doctor's recommendations.

17

40s and 50s: Flu

woman being vaccinated
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Get a flu shot every year.

18

40s and 50s: Diabetes

doctor with glucometer and insulin pen device talking to male patient at medical office in hospital
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Adults over age 45 should be tested for diabetes or prediabetes. If results are normal, repeat every three years (although your doctor may recommend more frequent testing, depending on results and risk factors).

19

40s and 50s: Cholesterol

Cholesterol Test
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Have your cholesterol and related factors for heart disease checked every four to six years.

20

40s and 50s: Blood Pressure

Doctor Measuring Patients Blood Pressure With Stethoscope
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Have your blood pressure tested at least every two years.

21

40s and 50s: Heart Attack

doctor talking with female patient in doctors office
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Have your doctor calculate your 10-year risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

22

40s and 50s: Mammogram

Doctor Assisting Woman Undergoing Mammogram X-ray Test
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Women should have an annual mammogram from ages 45 to 54. After that, you can have one every one or two years, the American Cancer Society says.

23

40s and 50s: Pap Test & HPV

Vaginal Smear
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Women should have a Pap test and HPV test every five years until age 65.

24

40s and 50s: Prostate Cancer

Man with health problem visiting urologist at hospital
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Men over age 55 should discuss the pros and cons of the PSA test for prostate cancer with their doctor.

25

40s and 50s: Colon Cancer

Gastrologist. Doctor's office. Doctor gastroenterologist with probe to perform gastroscopy and colonoscopy
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Everyone over age 45 should be tested for colon cancer, either through an annual fecal immunochemical test (FIT) or colonoscopy. If colonoscopy results are normal, repeat every 10 years.

26

40s and 50s: Shingles

shingrix vaccine bottles are a new shingles vaccines on the market
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Adults 50 and over should get the shingles vaccine every five years.

27

40s and 50s: Tetanus

Hands in blue gloves are typing a yellow vaccine in a syringe
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Get a tetanus booster shot every 10 years.

28

40s and 50s: Tdap

Tdap Vaccine in a glass vial for Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis
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Have a booster shot for tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (Tdap) every 10 years.

29

40s and 50s: Additional Vaccines

Doctor showing test results to a patient, portrait.
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Ask your doctor whether additional vaccines (such as hepatitis A and B, varicella and meningococcal disease) are right for you.

30

40s and 50s: STDs

Abdominal pain patient woman having medical exam with doctor
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Talk with your doctor about your risk factors for STDs and whether you should be screened regularly.

31

40s and 50s: Alcohol and Tobacco

Bartender Serve Whiskey, on wood bar.
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Talk with your doctor about your alcohol consumption and tobacco use.

32

40s and 50s: Exercise

Group of young multiethnic people stretching legs at the gym
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Get at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise five days a week, with two days of strength training weekly.

33

60s and 70s

Middle Aged Couple Meeting Friends Around Table In Coffee Shop
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This isn't the end of your life; it's the beginning of your best life. Your Golden Years can be tarnished unless you take the following precautions. Click on to read them.

34

60s and 70s: Check-Up

doctor listening to elderly patient's heart with stethoscope
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Get a regular check-up, according to your doctor's recommendations.

35

60s and 70s: Flu

Doctor vaccinating mature woman patient.
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Get a flu shot every year.

36

60s and 70s: Diabetes

Woman checking blood sugar level while sitting on bench
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Get a diabetes test at least every three years (although your doctor may recommend you be tested more often, depending on results and risk factors).

37

60s and 70s: Cholesterol

Blood Cholesterol Report Test Healthcare
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Have your cholesterol and related factors for heart disease checked every four to six years.

38

60s and 70s: Blood Pressure

nurse checking woman's blood pressure
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Have your blood pressure tested at least every two years.

39

60s and 70s: Heart Attack

female doctor in consultation with senior patient
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Have your doctor calculate your 10-year risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

40

60s and 70s: Mammogram

Nurse Assisting Patient Undergoing Mammogram
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Women should have a mammogram every one to two years. After age 75, ask your doctor if routine screening is still necessary.

41

60s and 70s: Pap Test and HPV

Selective focus microscope glass slide for scientist diagnosis blurry and microscope lens at cytology and pathology department in the hospital
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Women should have a Pap test and HPV test every five years until age 65.

42

60s and 70s: Colon Cancer

Patient with doctor checking on stomach diseases or gastropathy include gastritis, gastroparesis, diarrhea on senior female in hospital.
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Be tested for colon cancer, either through an annual fecal immunochemical test (FIT) or colonoscopy. If colonoscopy results are normal, repeat every 10 years until age 75.

43

60s and 70s: Bone Density

Close up Bone density machine,The X-ray department of hospital used for diagnose osteoporosis symptoms
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Women should have a baseline bone density scan at age 65, and men at 70.

44

60s and 70s: Prostate Cancer

blood sample in tube labeled with text PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) test
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Men should discuss the pros and cons of the PSA test for prostate cancer with their doctor.

45

60s and 70s: Shingles

Hands in blue gloves are typing a yellow vaccine in a syringe
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Adults 50 and over should get the shingles vaccine every five years.

46

60s and 70s: Pneumonia

Pneumococcal Pneumonia vaccine with syringe and stethoscope
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After age 65, ask your doctor if the pneumonia vaccine is right for you.

47

60s and 70s: Tetanus

tetanus vaccination
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Get a tetanus booster shot every 10 years.

48

60s and 70s: Tdap

DTap vaccine vial with syringe
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Have a booster shot for tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (Tdap) every 10 years.

49

60s and 70s: Additional Vaccines

Doctor injecting vaccine to senior woman
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Ask your doctor whether additional vaccines (such as hepatitis A and B, varicella and meningococcal disease) are right for you.

50

60s and 70s: STDs

Man at doctor
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Talk with your doctor about your risk factors for STDs and whether you should be screened regularly.

51

60s and 70s: Alcohol and Tobacco

Middle-aged loving couple have a romantic dinner
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Talk with your doctor about your alcohol consumption and tobacco use.

52

60s and 70s: Exercise

Mature fit people biking in the gym, exercising legs doing cardio workout cycling bikes
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Get at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise five days a week, with two days of strength training weekly.

And to avoid having to go to the doctor at all, don't miss this essential list of the 101 Unhealthiest Habits on the Planet.

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