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CDC Says This is How to Practice Self-Care Right Now

“Doing these simple actions can make such a difference in how we feel and how we respond to stress.”
FACT CHECKED BY Alek Korab
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It has been a year since the country first locked down as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. And while it is still important to take prevention measures against the virus, taking care of yourself and your mental health should also be a priority, according to Dr. Rochelle Walensky, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. During Wednesday's White House COVID-19 Response Team Briefing, she offered guidance on how to practice self-care right now. Read on to hear her advice—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus

CDC Chief Said How to Practice Self-Care

Dr. Walensky emphasized the importance of taking care of ourselves and others. "I want to remind you all that it is equally important that we raise up actions to help each other to maintain wellness, wellbeing, and resilience," she said. "This applies to everyone, whether you are already vaccinated or waiting to be vaccinated. Please take care of yourself." 

She suggested a variety of ways to do this. "If you've gotten out of your old welcomed routine this past year, like so many of us have, try to get back to those things that make you feel better, give you meaning, and help you feel connected, even if virtually," she said. "Connect with people, take a walk, safely connect with a friend and that, or check in on a neighbor, while you make sure you are getting enough, sleep, eating, balanced, and helping meals and get regular exercise." 

Why is self care so important? "Doing these simple actions can make such a difference in how we feel and how we respond to stress," she explained. "Take breaks from the news and social media—while it's good to be informed hearing about the pandemic all day, every day can be upsetting." She also suggests "considering limiting the news to just a couple of times a day, and disconnecting from screens for a while."

RELATED: Doctors Say "DO NOT" Do This After Your COVID Vaccine.

"Do Get Vaccinated," Walensky Pleaded

For other tips on how to improve wellbeing, she suggests heading over the CDC website. And of course, "do get vaccinated when the vaccine is available to you," she urges. "Doing so opens up even more opportunities to connect safely in person with others, in small gatherings." Also, don't forget to follow Dr. Anthony Fauci's fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—wear a face mask that fits snugly and is double layered, don't travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, don't go indoors with people you're not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, get vaccinated when it becomes available to you, and to protect your life and the lives of others, don't visit any of these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.

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