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The CDC Just Issued New Warning About COVID Vaccine

“If...you think you might be having a severe allergic reaction,” follow this CDC advice.
FACT CHECKED BY Checkmark Emilia Paluszek
Female patient smiling behind the face mask and with her eyes, while getting flu shot

In Alaska, three people have had allergic reactions to the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, following two medical workers in the U.K. who experienced something similar. Each of them demonstrated symptoms of anaphylactoid reaction, leading U.K. authorities to advise anyone with that condition to not take the vaccine. Now, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued its own warning. Read on to hear it, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus

Use Caution if You "Have Experienced Severe Allergic Reactions"

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading infectious disease expert, was asked if he agrees with the U.K. directive. "I do. I do," he said. "We are very carefully monitoring these things. And when we see something like an allergic reaction, you modify the recommendation and you say that someone who has a history of a severe allergic reaction, that those individuals don't get vaccinated now with this product, or if they do get vaccinated, they do it in a location that has the capability of responding to an allergic reaction."

Officially, the FDA says "you should not get the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine if you: 

  • had a severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of this vaccine 
  • had a severe allergic reaction to any ingredient of this vaccine."

The CDC weighed on December 19th, with the following posting:

"CDC has learned of reports that some people have experienced severe allergic reactions—also known as anaphylaxis—after getting a COVID-19 vaccine. As an example, an allergic reaction is considered severe when a person needs to be treated with epinephrine or EpiPen© or if they must go to the hospital.

If you get a COVID-19 vaccine and you think you might be having a severe allergic reaction after leaving the vaccination site, seek immediate medical care by calling 911."

What the CDC Recommends

The CDC goes on: "If you have ever had a severe allergic reaction to any ingredient in a COVID-19 vaccine, CDC recommends that you should not get that specific vaccine. If you have had a severe allergic reaction to other vaccines or injectable therapies, you should ask your doctor if you should get a COVID-19 vaccine. Your doctor will help you decide if it is safe for you to get vaccinated.

RELATED: 7 Tips You Must Follow to Avoid COVID, Say Doctors

CDC recommends that people with a history of severe allergic reactions not related to vaccines or injectable medications—such as allergies to food, pet, venom, environmental, or latex—may still get vaccinated. People with a history of allergies to oral medications or a family history of severe allergic reactions, or who might have an milder allergy to vaccines (no anaphylaxis)—may also still get vaccinated.

If you have a severe allergic reaction after getting the first shot, you should not get the second shot. Your doctor may refer you to a specialist in allergies and immunology to provide more care or advice."

Safeguards Are in Place

Says the CDC: "CDC has provided recommendations for COVID-19 vaccination providers about how to prepare for the possibility of a severe allergic reaction:

  • All people who get a COVID-19 vaccine should be monitored on-site. People with a history of severe allergic reactions should be monitored for 30 minutes after getting the vaccine. All other people should be monitored for 15 minutes after getting the vaccine.
  • Vaccination providers should have appropriate medications and equipment—such as epinephrine, antihistamines, stethoscopes, blood pressure cuffs, and timing devices to check your pulse—at all COVID-19 vaccination sites.
  • If you experience a severe allergic reaction after getting a COVID-19 vaccine, vaccination providers should provide rapid care and call for emergency medical services. You should continue to be monitored in a medical facility for at least several hours.

Learn more about what to expect after getting vaccinated for COVID-19, including normal side effects and tips to reduce pain or discomfort."

How to Survive the Pandemic

As for yourself, the vaccine is not yet available to those who aren't the highest priority, so follow Dr. Fauci's fundamentals and help end this surge—wear a face mask, social distance, avoid large crowds, don't go indoors with people you're not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene and to protect your life and the lives of others, don't visit any of these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.

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