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Dr. Fauci Says There's a Rise of COVID in These States

Cases are starting to surge for a reason.
FACT CHECKED BY Alek Korab
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Over the last few months COVID-19 cases started to plateau and even decline in most parts of the country. However, over the last few weeks, the trend has started turning around in some states, who are experiencing a rise of infections. During Friday's White House COVID-19 Response Team Briefing, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the chief medical advisor to the President and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, revealed where this is happening and why. Read on to learn which states are experiencing a spike in COVID cases—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus

When asked to address why there has been an uptick in cases in some states—including New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island—Dr. Fauci revealed that it has to do with restrictions being pulled back. 

"It really relates to what we have been saying in the past few briefings that we've given," he said. "We're at a position right now where we have a plateauing around 53,000 cases per day. The concern is that throughout the country there are a number of state-city regions that are pulling back on some of the mitigation methods that we've been talking about—the withdrawal of mask mandates, the pulling back to essentially non-public health measures being implemented."

He continued to explain that this is why the task force has expressed so much concern "that it is really quite risky to declare victory before you have the level of infection in the community to a much, much lower level than 53,000 cases per day." 

"So it is unfortunate, but not surprising to me that you are seeing increases in the number of cases per day in areas, cities, states, or regions—even though vaccines are being distributed at a pretty good clip of 2,000,000 to 3,000,000 million per day, that could be overcome. if certain areas pull back prematurely on the mitigation and public health measures that we all talk about," he added. 

Here are 5 states where COVID isn't going down quite fast enough.

1

New York 

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New cases per capita are at least double the national average in New York City. "As of last week, a virus variant that was first detected in New York City recently made up a growing proportion of new cases there," reports the New York Times.

2

New Jersey

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"New Jersey on Friday reported another 3,378 confirmed cases of the coronavirus and 27 additional confirmed deaths as the state increased capacity at indoor businesses, including restaurants and casinos, to 50%, but Gov. Phil Murphy warned the state is no longer seeing steady declines in cases and hospitalizations," according to NJ.com.

3

Rhode Island

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"Gov. Dan McKee on Thursday announced all Rhode Islanders 16 years and older will be eligible for COVID-19 vaccines by April 19, significantly advancing a timeline outlined earlier in the week," reports WPRI. "The governor said the decision was made after the federal government shared information earlier this week that indicated the state would be receiving an increase in vaccine supply in the coming weeks."

4

Massachusetts

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"The Massachusetts Department of Public Health reported an additional 1,857 confirmed COVID-19 cases Thursday, bringing the statewide total to 574,135 since the start of the pandemic," reports WCVB. "State health officials also added 27 confirmed COVID-19-related deaths to the state's total, which is now 16,426."

RELATED: Dr. Fauci Just Said This is the Best Vaccine to Get

5

Connecticut

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"People 45 years old and up are now eligible for a coronavirus vaccine in Connecticut and Gov. Ned Lamont said anyone 16 years old and up who wants a vaccine should be eligible in early April," reports NBC Connecticut. "Anyone who will be eligible for a vaccine will be able to register with VAMS, the Vaccine Administration Management System."

6

How to Stay Safe

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So follow Fauci's fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—wear a face mask that fits snugly and is double layered, don't travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, don't go indoors with people you're not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, get vaccinated when it becomes available to you, and to protect your life and the lives of others, don't visit any of these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.