Skip to content

These States Already Have 10% of Adults Vaccinated

These states "have already provided first vaccinations to more than 10% of their adult populations."
FACT CHECKED BY Emilia Paluszek
oklahoma city skyline

As the states push to get as many people the coronavirus vaccine as possible, the race is on: when will we reach herd immunity, with 75 to 85% of the country vaccinated? During a press briefing by the White House COVID-19 Response Team, a few states were singled out for having a head start. "One of the core elements of our plan is accelerating the process of vaccinating the country to protect people from COVID-19 as quickly and as safely as possible for the past week," said Andy Slavitt, a senior adviser to the response team and the former acting head of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. "I want to call out seven states that have already provided first vaccinations to more than 10% of their adult populations." Read on to see if your state made the list—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus

1

Alaska

Anchorage Skyline with a winter reflection
Shutterstock

"Alaska last week was administering more COVID-19 shots per capita than any other state in the nation, a striking statistic given the challenge of getting vaccine across rugged roadless terrain to far-flung communities in the nation's only Arctic state," reports the Anchorage Daily News. "Nearly 11% of the state's population was at least partially vaccinated by Monday. Still, Alaska's rollout has hit rough spots, especially for seniors. And Alaska's ranking isn't nearly as high when it comes to shots administered out of the total received, where the state falls closer to the middle of the national picture, according to data from the CDC."

2

Connecticut

Connecticut State Capitol in Hartford, Connecticut, USA during autumn.
Shutterstock

 

"Connecticut will receive a slight boost in its weekly vaccine supply, Gov. Ned Lamont said Thursday as distributors stress the need for more doses from the federal government and residents grow increasingly anxious for inoculation," reports the Hartford Courant. "The state's weekly allotment will increase from 46,000 first doses to 54,000, Lamont said, which could slightly speed the process of vaccinating more than 1 million residents in the ongoing Phase 1B. The governor said those doses will be specifically focused on elderly residents in the state's 'underserved communities.'"

3

North Dakota

State Capitol of North Dakota, Bismarck
Shutterstock

"COVID-19 vaccines are being administered at really high rates in North Dakota compared to other states, but does that mean our vaccines are running low?" asks KFYR TV. "State health officials say they don't think North Dakota will run out of vaccines." "Until we get further down into that priority group I think that we will always have a demand and I think that's a good thing. I think that it shows that people are starting to take the vaccine seriously and thinks it's a safe and effective way to stop the spread of COVID-19," said Department of Health Director of Field Services Brenton Nesemeier.

4

Oklahoma

Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA skyline at twilight.
Shutterstock

"Officials with the Oklahoma State Department of Health announced on Thursday that 10% of eligible adults in the state, about 373,279 people, have received at least their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine," reports KOCO. "We are incredibly thrilled to have reached such a significant milestone," State Commissioner of Health Dr. Lance Frye said in a news release. "Thanks to the help of numerous partners, such as our local county health departments, hospitals, long term care facilities, Walgreens and CVS and many others, we have been able to get the vaccine into the arms of our most vulnerable populations."

5

South Dakota

A storm rolls in at dawn at the South Dakota State Capitol building in Pierre, South Dakota
Shutterstock

"South Dakota is going to be receiving more COVID-19 vaccine doses in the coming weeks, the Department of Health said Wednesday," reports the Argus Leader. "The state will start to receive about 12,800 weekly doses next week, said Secretary of Health Kim Malsam-Rysdon, up from the previous weeks' 11,000 doses. The increase comes after the federal government changed distribution strategies and increased shipments to states, rather than keeping vials in reserve for second doses."

RELATED: If You Feel This, You May Have Already Had COVID, Says Dr. Fauci

6

West Virginia

Charleston, West Virginia
Shutterstock

"West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice lauded his state's coronavirus vaccine distribution success, and claimed that if the Mountain State had the 'doses by Valentine's Day, every person in this state, 65 years of age and older, would be vaccinated,'" reports CNBC. "West Virginia has spent the past three weeks as either the number one or number two state in the nation for vaccine doses administered per capita, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Covid-19 Vaccination Tracker. The state also boasts a first dose administration rate of 95.2% and a second dose vaccination rate of 46.8%, according to vaccine data posted to West Virginia's Covid-19 dashboard Wednesday."

7

New Mexico

Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA downtown skyline at dusk.
Shutterstock

New Mexicans who are eligible:

  • Residents at long term care facilities and skilled nursing facilities
  • Workers and contractors at long term care facilities and skilled nursing facilities
  • Hospital personnel
  • Medical first responders
  • Congregate setting workers
  • Persons providing direct medical care and other in-person services
  • Home-based healthcare and hospice workers
  • Individuals 75 years of age
  • Individuals 16 years of age and older at risk of COVID complications
  • Pharmacy team members that supporting off-site vaccine clinics at long term care facilities and skilled nursing facilities
  • Hospital workers with Token Authorization Code

8

How to Stay Healthy No Matter Where You Live

girl wear medical face mask on sunny city street
Shutterstock

Follow the public health fundamentals and help end this surge, no matter where you live—wear a face mask, social distance, avoid large crowds, don't go indoors with people you're not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, get vaccinated when it becomes available to you, and to protect your life and the lives of others, don't visit any of these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.