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Surgeon General Issues "Worried" COVID Warning

The Delta variant means you are target, particularly if you are unvaccinated.
FACT CHECKED BY Emilia Paluszek
Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy

The coronavirus isn't done with us yet, as a new variant, dubbed Delta, will soon become the most dominant, and most threatening, one in the United States. Should you be worried? Well, one person is, and he's not alone: Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, who appeared on Fox News to sound an alarm about why you may be at risk, and what you can do to protect yourself. Read on for five pieces of life-saving advice, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You Have "Long" COVID and May Not Even Know It.

1

The Surgeon General Said He is "Very Worried" About the Delta Variant

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"I am very worried about the Delta variant," said Dr. Murthy. "This is a version of COVID-19 that is far more transmissible than any variant we've seen to date. There's some data that indicates it may also be more dangerous, but more to come on that. But what we've seen around the world is that it has spread very fast in India, in the United Kingdom and the UK. It's nearly a hundred percent of new cases, and it's a double mirror—in nearly every two weeks here in the United States." 

2

Being Unvaccinated Puts You at Greater Risk, Says Surgeon General

Man gesturing stop to nurse offering syringe with vaccine.
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"The good news is that the vaccines that we have appear to be effective against the Delta variants. So if you are vaccinated, you're in good shape. If you are not vaccinated, unfortunately you are at greater risk because we have a highly transmissible variant that is spreading quickly and that's a Delta variant."

3

Surgeon General Said if You're Vaccinated, You've Got a "High Degree of Protection"

African American man in antiviral mask gesturing thumb up during coronavirus vaccination, approving of covid-19 immunization
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"If you're fully vaccinated, you should feel good," said the doctor. "That's right. You should feel that you've got—and nothing is a hundred percent—but you've got a high degree of protection against symptomatic infection and an even higher, a greater than 95% protection against hospitalization and death.

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4

You May Consider Masking Up Under These Circumstances, Says the Surgeon General

Woman put on medical protective mask for protection against coronavirus.
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"We're seeing across the country, just to level set here, is we're seeing a lot of variation, some parts of the country that have really high vaccination rates, other parts of the country that have really low vaccination rates, 30% or below in some cases compared to the 80% above," he said, "we're seeing in other parts of the country and in parts of the country where there are low vaccination rates, we are starting to see more outbreaks driven by the Delta variant. Here's what the science tells us about masking then. It tells us that if you are fully vaccinated, that means two weeks after your last dose, that you are highly protected and your chances of both getting sick and transmitting the virus to someone else are low. And that's why the CDC came out and said that if you're fully vaccinated, then because of that low risk, you don't have to mask indoors or outdoors. Now, there are some circumstances where individuals may decide they want to continue masking. Maybe they're in an area that's at high risk. Maybe they live at home with unvaccinated individuals. There are also circumstances where localities may decide that they want to put in place more restricted measures. And that is absolutely their right to do so. But the science is clear that if you are fully vaccinated, your risk of getting COVID 19 is low."

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5

Surgeon General Says We Should Keep Wearing Masks When Travelling or on Public Transportation

woman sitting inside airplane wearing KN95 FFP2 protective mask
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Will we keep having to wear masks when travelling? "It's something that CDC is actively evaluating," said the doctor. "As the new science comes in, as we learn more about the variants about how the virus is spreading in the United States, then they continue to reevaluate their guidance. So for the time being though their current guidance is to keep masking on planes and another public transportation. With the Delta variant spreading, I think that that's concerning to many of us. So there, if there, when the if and when the science changes, their guidance will change." So get vaccinated when it becomes available to you, and to protect your life and the lives of others, don't visit any of these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.

Alek Korab
Alek Korab is a Co-Founder and Managing Editor of the ETNT Health channel on Eat This, Not That! Read more