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Trump Is Taking This Experimental Coronavirus Treatment

Regeneron is not yet approved by the FDA—here is what you need to know.
REGN-COV2, Regeneron's investigational double antibody cocktail for the treatment and prevention of COVID-19

According to Trump's physician, Dr. Sean Conley, in addition to taking Remdesivir (an experimental drug the FDA has given emergency use approval to treat hospitalized COVID-19 patients), zinc, vitamin D, melatonin, aspirin, and famotidine (a heartburn medicine), the President is also taking en experimental drug not yet approved by the FDA. 

According to the White House memo, "as a precautionary measure" Trump "received a single 8 gram dose of Regeneron's polyclonal antibody cocktail." "He completed the infusion without incident," Conley revealed in a statement released by the White House. 

Regeneron confirmed the news, adding that he had been given "a cocktail of two monoclonal antibodies" per a "'compassionate use' request from the President's physicians." Read on, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus.

What Is Regeneron?

Regeneron's treatment is officially known as REGN-COV2 and involves using monoclonal antibodies in order to boost the immune system response to the virus. 

While polyclonal antibodies are made using multiple different immune cells, monoclonal antibodies involve identical immune cells that are clones of a specific parent cell. 

REGN-COV2 involves a combination of two monoclonal antibodies, harvested from genetically modified mice as well as humans. 

"To develop REGN-COV2, Regeneron scientists evaluated thousands of fully-human antibodies produced by the company's VelocImmune® mice, which have been genetically modified to have a human immune system, as well as antibodies identified from humans who have recovered from COVID-19," Regeneron explains in a press release. 

RELATED: CDC Warns of Deadly New COVID Syndrome

What Does Regeneron Work?

Their "two potent, virus-neutralizing antibodies" work to "bind non-competitively to the critical receptor binding domain of the virus's spike protein," which, the company explains, can effectively treat the virus even when it mutates. 

"Preclinical studies have shown that REGN-COV2 reduced the amount of virus and associated damage in the lungs of non-human primates," they maintain, citing evidence from their trials published this week, involving 275 non-hospitalized patients. The study found that in addition to reducing viral load of the virus, it was safe and also improved symptoms in patients. 

According to George D. Yancopoulos, MD, Ph.D., President and Chief Scientific Officer of Regeneron, the treatment is most beneficial in "patients who had not mounted their own effective immune response, suggesting that REGN-COV2 could provide a therapeutic substitute for the naturally-occurring immune response."

"These patients were less likely to clear the virus on their own, and were at greater risk for prolonged symptoms." As for yourself: To get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don't miss these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.

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