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The CDC Says You Should Do This After Grocery Shopping

It seems obvious, but can be easily forgotten.
Woman wearing white medical face mask to prevent infection, arriving home, holding paper shopping bag. Protection against coronavirus

There's no need to disinfect the food you buy after grocery shopping. The CDC says "there is no evidence that food or food packaging plays a significant role in spreading the virus," but you should still abide by rules for proper cleaning, separating, cooking, and storing.

But, there is something else you should do after grocery shopping, according to the country's disease center. You've already heard that using hand sanitizer is important, but even if you disinfect your hands right after leaving the supermarket, there is no question you should still be washing your hands when you get home. Of course, it should be for at least 20 seconds, lathering with soap and water.

Related: 11 Unsafest Things You Can Do at the Grocery Store, Say Doctors

In fact, the CDC says doing both is the safest way to prevent yourself from getting the virus. With tons of new safety measures and to-do's to follow because of the coronavirus pandemic, it can be easy for one to slip your mind.

But some of the riskiest behaviors that doctors warn about involve some of these new guidelines. For example, wearing gloves is one of the unsafest things you can do while shopping. You can spread germs to whatever you touch, says one doctor. "People may get a false sense of security when wearing gloves, but they forget that the gloves are contaminated once they touch a surface," Dr. Rashmi Byakodi, the editor of Best Nutrition, says.

So although it's been a few months since a hand-washing craze spread suds throughout the whole country, it might be time to revisit some critical techniques to use when washing your hands.

First of all, you should not grab soap first. Instead, wet them and then get soap, making sure there is enough to cover your hands. Then you should be scrubbing for at least 20 seconds. This is enough time for the soap to activate and kill any unwanted germs. Finally, dry them adequately so there's no water left.

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Amanda McDonald
Amanda McDonald is a health and food writer and a certified yoga instructor. Read more
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