Cook This!

Chili-Mango Chicken Stir Fry

The heat comes from a lashing of chili sauce and the sweet from mango chunks.

Cook This!

Chili-Mango Chicken Stir Fry

The heat comes from a lashing of chili sauce and the sweet from mango chunks.

The combination of heat and sweet is a rollercoaster for our taste buds and a partnership that lurks behind—knowingly or not—our affection for so many Asian dishes: General Tso’s, orange chicken, and mu shu pork, among others. Here, that combination upgrades a basic chicken stir-fry to something special with just two ingredients: The heat comes from a lashing of chili sauce (look for the bottle with the Red Rooster and a green screw-on cap) and the sweet from a thin coating of quick-cooked mango chunks.

Ingredients


Makes 4 servings

1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs, chopped into 1/2" pieces
1 Tbsp cornstarch
1 Tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
½ Tbsp sesame oil
½ Tbsp peanut or canola oil
1 red onion, chopped
1 Tbsp grated or minced fresh ginger
2 cups sugar snap peas
1 mango, peeled, pitted, and chopped
1 Tbsp chili garlic sauce (preferably sambal oleek)
Black pepper to taste

Per Serving:
240 calories
8 g fat (1 g saturated)
410 mg sodium

How to Make it


step 1

Combine the chicken, cornstarch, soy sauce, and sesame oil in a mixing bowl and let sit for 10 minutes.

step 2

Heat the peanut oil in a wok or large skillet over high heat. Add the onion and ginger and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until the onion is translucent. Add the sugar snaps and stir-fry for 1 minute, using a metal spatula to keep the vegetables in near-constant motion. Add the chicken, along with its marinade, and stir-fry for about 2 minutes, until the meat begins to brown on the outside. Add the mango, chili sauce, and black pepper and stir-fry for 1 minute longer, until the chicken is cooked through and the mango has softened into a near sauce-like consistency. Serve over brown rice.

Note: Sugar snaps can be expensive and difficult to find outside peak season (late spring to early summer). Snow peas, green beans, and even broccoli all make solid substitutes.