Skip to content

One Major Effect Drinking Coffee Has on Your Longevity, New Study Says

You knew it made mornings better... but coffee may also help you live longer, according to new research.
Coffee

The benefits of your coffee habit go beyond that morning perk you crave. Not only is coffee said to be good for your liver (yes, really), now brand new research is suggesting that coffee may also add years to your life.

Researchers at Korea's Chung-Ang University, in collaboration with the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency, conducted a new study that's been published in the latest issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Looking specifically at their population, the study aimed to better understand the association between coffee consumption and its health effects related to mortality.

RELATED: The 7 Healthiest Foods To Eat Right Now

The study involved 110,920 participants over age 40 who had not been diagnosed with diabetes, cancer, or cardiovascular disease. The researchers tracked the participants' daily coffee intake and their death rate for an average of 9.1 years.

The results of the study, according to the Korean Herald, suggested that "death risks from all causes dropped by 21 percent for participants who drank more than three cups of coffee a day." Further, "Coffee was significantly associated with a reduction of cardiovascular diseases. One cup of coffee a day was linked with a reduction in deaths from heart related illnesses by 42 percent."

And with more of us getting experimental with our coffee preparation thanks to more time at home during the pandemic, one point of interest about this study is that the researchers gave weight to one particular type of coffee—from the Korean Herald: "Coffee's health benefits were identical in instant coffee that includes sugar and creamer."

For more on the science behind coffee and your health, read up on that liver insight in One Major Effect Drinking Coffee Has on Your Liver, According To Experts. Also don't miss These Are the Worst Types of Coffee for Your Heart Health, Science Says.

Here's hoping you'll enjoy that brew for many mornings to come. Sign up for the Eat This, Not That! newsletter for daily nutrition news you can use, and keep reading:

Krissy Gasbarre
Krissy is a senior news editor at Eat This, Not That!, managing morning and weekend news related nutrition, wellness, restaurants and groceries (with a focus on beverages), and more. Read more
Filed Under