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The Most Popular Drink in Every State

From big-name brands to regional brews, we've found the top soft drink in your home state.
The Most Popular Drink in Every State

While bottled water sales continue to surpass soda’s, we’re still allowed to indulge in a sugary drink—whether it be soda or juice—every once in a blue moon. Whether you prefer to pair the fizzy (or flat!) stuff with some buttered popcorn at the movie theater or guzzle it down with pizza, we’ve rounded up the most popular non-alcoholic drinks in the U.S.

Methodology: We looked at where certain drinks are produced, looked into regional sodas, and researched sales and agricultural data to come to our own conclusions.

Find out the most popular drink in every state below. Did your favorite make the list?

Alabama — Grapico

Grapico soda bottle

Grapico made its debut in 1916, and it has stolen southerners’ hearts ever since. About 40 million cases of the artificially-flavored bottles and cans are produced annually in Birmingham, Alabama.

Alaska — Pepsi

Pepsi

The Pepsi Cola Bottling Company of Alaska, Inc. was founded in 1905 in Anchorage, and it still continues to win over The Last Frontier.

Arizona — Cactus Cooler

Cactus cooler can

While it started out as a cult classic in the 80s, Cactus Cooler was recently brought back by popular demand. The tropical orange and pineapple mix is a big hit in Arizona.

Arkansas — Grapette

grapette soda

Grapette began in Camden, Arkansas, in 1938, where Benjamin Tyndle Fooks spent a year formulating what would become the southern state’s most beloved pop. It wasn’t until the spring of 1940 that the fruity soda was named and sold as Grapette.

California — Cold-Pressed Juice

Fruit juice juicing Shutterstock

Convenient and tasty, cold-pressed juices are making a splash in The Golden State. In fact, people are swapping their morning basic glass of OJ and afternoon doughnut so much so that the industry is estimated at an impressive $100 million annually, an LA Times report states. You can find Hollywood making their rounds at Pressed Juicery and Moon Juice.

Colorado — B. Stiff & Sons Root Beer

B. stiff and sons root beer

B. Stiff and Sons Root Beer is the top-selling craft root beer in Colorado, according to Fort Collins Magazine, Northern Colorado’s premier general interest publication. The line has since expanded to include four new flavors: ginger beer, orange cream, cream soda, and black cherry.

Connecticut — Foxon Park

Foxon park bottle

Foxon Park has been family-owned and operated in East Haven for almost a century. There are currently 17 flavors—including Kola, White Birch, and the signature Gassosa—which are all made with natural cane sugar.

Delaware — Old Dominion Root Beer

Old dominion root beer bottle

The Old Dominion Brewing Company was originally founded in Virginia, and but it’s now based in Dover, Delaware. Old Dominion has been spewing out root beer sweetened with Virginia honey since 1994.

Florida — Orange Juice

Orange juice with fresh oranges Shutterstock

No surprise here—the Sunshine State’s subtropical climate grows the best oranges. So much so that FL is the biggest producer of the citrus in the U.S., cranking out about 3.4 million tons, according to the USDA. Here’s another fun fact: Florida’s official state flower is the orange blossom.

Georgia — Coca-Cola

Coca cola

The 20-acre World of Coca-Cola, a museum dedicated to Georgia’s favorite soda, is located in the Peach State.

Hawaii — Pineapple Juice

pineapple juice Shutterstock

Hawaii boasts the perfect climate and soil for tropical fruits, according to The US 50, the state’s primary agriculture consists of pineapple and cane sugar: two main components of pineapple juice. You’ll find the refreshing juice in a Blue Hawaiian cocktail.

Idaho — IronPort

IronPort soda bottle

According to Five Star Soda, IronPort is Idaho’s go-to. If you’ve never been to the northwestern state, you’ve probably never heard of it.

Illinois — Green River

Green river bottle

The lime-flavored pop was first produced in 1919 by the Schoenhofen Edelweiss Brewing Company of Chicago, which formerly produced beers.

Indiana — Triple XXX

Triple xxx root beer bottle

Triple XXX was evicted out of its original production house in Texas during Prohibition. That’s when it relocated to Galveston, Indiana, where it could keep quenching people’s thirst for its root beer.

Iowa — Sioux City Sarsaparilla

sioux city sarsaparilla

These bottles, named after the artistic Iowan city, have been produced since 1987, and they’re regarded as one of the more upscale bottles to sip.

Kansas — Lost Trail Root Beer

Lost trail root beer

The draft-style, micro-brewed root beer is born and raised in the Wheat State.

Kentucky — Ale-8-One

ale 8 1 soda

Ale-8-One (pronounced “a late one”) debuted in the 1926 Clark County Fair in KY. On February 5, 2013, House Bill No. 205 proposed that the ginger-citrus soda be named the official Kentucky original soft drink, and one month later, Governor Steve Beshear signed the bill naming Ale-8-One just that.

Louisiana — Abita Root Beer

abita root beer

Abita Brewing Co. was born 30 miles north of New Orleans in 1986, after which is made root beer flavored with yucca alongside its line of craft beers. They brew 9,100 barrels of root beer, which are a definite hit in Louisiana.

Maine — Moxie

Moxie bottle

Maine loves Moxie soda—a carbonated gentian-root-flavored bev—so much, it became The Pine Tree State’s official drink in 2005. The state is the birthplace of Moxie founder Dr. Augustin Thompson, and it shows its dedication to the drink by housing the Moxie museum in Union and hosting the Moxie Festival in Lisbon Falls every summer.

Maryland — Shasta

Shasta cola can

Shasta, a true Maryland favorite, made its effervescent debut in 1889 and rose to popularity in 1900. The lineup includes an array of colorful cans in flavors such as Grape, Fiesta Punch, and Kiwi Strawberry.

Massachusetts — Cranberry Juice

Cranberry juice cocktail Shutterstock

Whether you like it mixed into a vodka cocktail or swear by its ailment-healing powers, cranberry juice is so popular in MA that it was designated the state’s official Beverage of the Commonwealth in 1970. We’ll toast a glass to that!

Michigan — Faygo

Faygo soda bottle

We’d be surprised if you couldn’t find a bottle of Faygo in Michigan. The soda is still made in Detroit today.

Minnesota — Superior Switchel

superior switchel drink

Urban legend says that farmers and sailors drank Switchel—a hydrating elixir made of ginger, apple cider vinegar, and an unrefined sweetener—to get through the frigid winters and sweltering summers. Fast forward four centuries and Melissa, a former hockey player, rediscovered Switchel as a means to hydrate after a game. Melissa first sold Switchel at a Minnesota farmers market and now, it’s found in multiple retailers across the nation!

Mississippi — Barq’s Root Beer

Barq's root beer

Barq’s Root Beer was first sold in Mississippi, and it recently celebrated its 120th birthday. We think that calls for a root beer float!

Missouri — Sun Drop

Sundrop bottle

Fun fact: The citrus soda was invented on a random joyride in 1949 in St. Louis.

Montana — Flathead Lake

Flathead lake bottle

Montana’s beloved soda is named after the majestic lake that snakes through the northwest. However, the artificial colors in this soda make this pick murkier than the Atlantic.

Nebraska — Kool-Aid

Kool-aid

Although not a bubbly soda, Nebraska’s official state beverage is Kool-Aid, so we couldn’t bestow the state with any other colorful competitor. Oh yeah!

Nevada — Club Soda

Canada dry club soda

Food Network named Picon Punch—a cocktail with Amer Picon, grenadine, brandy, and club soda—Nevada’s unofficial state drink. Club soda gives the desert state’s go-to cocktail a coveted effervescence.

New Hampshire — Apple Cider

Apple cider hot toddy Shutterstock

Apple cider was designated New Hampshire’s official state beverage in 2010 and we’re not questioning it! There are about 150 apple growers in New Hampshire, which account for more than 1,400 acres of apple orchards, that produce the tart yet sweet drink. We’re wondering if it’s the beverage or the inspired doughnuts that continues to steal their hearts.

New Jersey — Boylan’s

boylans soda

Born and bottled in NJ, Boylan’s is likely the go-to cocktail mixer in Atlantic City. You’ll find it in timeless flavors such as root beer, ginger ale, and black cherry.

New Mexico — Piñon Coffee

new mexico pinon coffee

Piñon coffee is concocted with a multi-bean blend high-altitude Arabica coffee a custom piñon flavoring. According to the dedicated site, you can find New Mexico Piñon Coffee in almost every grocery store in New Mexico in addition to stores in Costco Colorado. The morning brew comes in 30 flavors including Biscochito and Mexican Spiced Chocolate.

New York — Arizona Iced Tea

arizona iced tea

Contrary to its name, Arizona iced tea calls New York home. Its headquarters are based in Long Island and modeled after a NY subway station, which is as metaphorically colorful as the cans. In 2016, Arizona sold over $3 billion worth of drinks and was deemed the second largest ready-to-drink tea brand in America, trailing behind Lipton, Forbes reports.

North Carolina — Cheerwine

Cheerwine soda

The first-ever cherry cola is also dubbed the “Nectar from North Carolina.” Also, despite its name, there’s no wine in Cheerwine.

North Dakota — Iced Tea

iced tea Shutterstock

Thanks to Estately, which grabbed Google Trends data on the most-searched drinks in each state over a decade, we know that ND’s go-to is the Long Island Iced Tea. Since we’re keeping this list accessible to all (which means no alcohol allowed!), we’re concluding that the Peace Garden State’s favorite drink is also the virgin version.

Ohio — Tomato Juice

Fresh tomato juice Shutterstock

Your favorite airplane sip is also Ohio’s official state drink. We like stirring tomato juice into a Bloody Mary or just sipping on it on its own for a savory yet refreshing beverage.

Oklahoma — Triple AAA Kola

triple aaa soda oklahoma Triple AAA Soda Co./Facebook

It won’t get you roadside assistance when you’re bothered with a flat tire, but Triple AAA Kola’s 24 different flavors will get you to a good place. The brand was established in 1937 by Albert Rochau and D.G. Carpenter and even had its own restaurant chain dubbed Thirst Station. While Triple AAA closed its doors in 1974, Bricktown Candy Co. worked to reopen the nostalgic soda in 2012, when it began re-serving pop to Oklahomians.

Oregon — Thomas Kemper Root Beer

Thomas kemper soda bottle

In 1990, The Thomas Kemper Brewing Company produced a root beer for those who didn’t imbibe alcohol. It’s a true treat for locals.

Pennsylvania — A-Treat

A-treat orange cream soda

A-Treat is headquartered in Allentown (is that where the A comes from?), and it features delicious and eccentric flavors such as orange cream, grapefruit, and birch beer.

Rhode Island — Yacht Club Soda

Yacht club soda

Based in North Providence, Yacht Club is the official soda and water company of Rhode Island. We’ll grab a bottle and sail through Providence River, please.

South Carolina — South Carolina Grown Tea

Iced tea Shutterstock

South Carolina grown tea was named the official state hospitality beverage of SC in 1995 because it was the first place in the U.S. to grow tea. In fact, the Palmetto State is home to the Charleston Tea Plantation, which dubs itself the as the “only tea plantation in North America where you can see hundreds of thousands of tea bushes stretching out acre after acre for almost as far as the eye can see.”

South Dakota — Millstream Brewing Root Beer

Millstream brewing root beer

One of the very few places to grab a bottle of this niche root beer is South Dakota. Get ’em while you can.

Tennessee — Fruit Tea

Iced tea Shutterstock

Sweet tea is a definite hit in the south, but folks from Tennessee think that fruit tea, especially, is the only ten they see. According to Tennessee Home & Farm, the refreshing drink is made with sweet tea, orange juice, pineapple juice, and limeade or lemonade. Fruit tea is a hit especially in middle TN and you can even find the beverage in major retailers such as Kroger and Publix stores throughout Tennessee and other southern states.

Texas — Dr. Pepper

Dr pepper

The cinnamon-flavored soda was invented by a pharmacist in 1885 in Waco, Texas, and it was dubbed Waco before undergoing a name change. Now, Dr. Pepper’s formula is safeguarded in two different Dallas bank vaults.

Utah — IronPort

IronPort soda bottle

Much like Idaho, IronPort is well-known in Utah, making this unicorn bev unique to the northwest region.

Vermont — SweetWater

vermont sweetwater

The Vermont family-owned and operated bottling company began when two brothers drank maple sap in their backyard and decided that the natural sweetener would fare well with some carbonation. We couldn’t agree more.

Virginia — Citrus Juice

Grapefruit juice Shutterstock

According to Estately‘s Google Trends-driven report, the top cocktail in Virginia is the Pisco Sour—which can only mean that Virginia folk love their sour citrus juice. We love grapefruit and lemon in our fruity sip.

Washington — Thomas Kemper

Thomas kemper bottle

Because Thomas Kemper was founded in Washington, we had to give it to the Evergreen State. Try the Ginger Ale, Black Cherry, and Grape.

West Virginia — Mountain Dew

Mountain dew

The Dew reigns supreme in West Virginia, Only in Your State reports.

Wisconsin — Sprecher Root Beer

Sprecher root beer

Milwaukee’s original craft brewery makes some of the best root beer, cream soda, and cherry cola. The sips achieve their signature flavor thanks to the brew-kettle-made extracts and fresh Wisconsin honey.

Wyoming — Jackson Hole Soda

Jackson hole soda high mountain huckleberry

The Wyoming company deems its creation “the best dang old-fashioned soda in the whole dang country.” According to the brand’s site, the High Mountain Huckleberry is the go-to.

RELATED: The easy guide to cutting back on sugar is finally here.

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