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This Ice Cream Brand Is Calling For a Trump Impeachment

And even more food brands are getting political this year.
FACT CHECKED BY Faye Brennan

In the current politically charged atmosphere that was kicked into high gear after last week's events in Washington, D.C., an increasing number of beloved food brands are voicing their opinions and core values.

Of course, some have chosen to silence their marketing efforts and are staying on the sidelines of the national conversation about events at the Capitol. But others, like Ben & Jerry's, are making public statements. The ice cream brand took to Twitter on Jan. 7 to call for the impeachment of President Trump. The president is believed to have been the inciting force behind the violent insurrection.

The Vermont-based ice-cream maker wrote: "Yesterday was not a protest—it was a riot to uphold white supremacy," and went on to describe a sharp contrast between "two Americas."

The lengthy Tweet ended with "Resign, impeach, 25th amendment… not one more day," referring to several different ways President Trump could be removed from office before his presidency comes to a close on Jan. 20.

Ben & Jerry's is known for its social justice crusade, advocating for the rights of minorities and marginalized groups. The latest illustration of these efforts was the release of Change the Whirled vegan ice cream in honor of racial justice advocate and superstar athlete, Colin Kaepernick. The company is donating a portion of proceeds from the sales to Know Your Rights Camp, an effort founded by Kaepernick to "advance the liberation and empowerment of Black and Brown communities."

And the ice cream makers are not alone—here are several other food brands that have been vocal about their social and political values. Don't miss The Saddest Restaurant Closures In Your State.

1

Coca-Cola

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In a recent Tweet, the beverage giant called last week's events at the Capitol "an offense to the ideals of American democracy." The post continues to call for a peaceful transition of power for the now-certified election results which officially declared Joe Biden the future president of the United States.

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2

Penzeys Spices

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While they haven't yet said anything about last week's events on social media, Penzeys Spices, the largest spice purveyor in the country, seems to be a doer rather than a talker. In an article published last year, The Washington Post revealed the spice company spent $92,000 from Sept. 29 to Oct. 5 of that year on Facebook ads championing impeachment—more than any other person or entity in the United States (including former Democratic presidential candidate and billionaire Tom Steyer).

3

Quaker Oats Company

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During last summer's social justice reckoning, several food giants decided to pull and rebrand their products considered to be racially insensitive in name and imagery. Aunt Jemima was one of the first and biggest brands to be denounced, as parent company Quaker acknowledged in a press release the brand was based on a racial stereotype.

4

Mars Food

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Following suit, Mars announced it would be retiring its Uncle Ben's brand. "We recognize that now is the right time to evolve the Uncle Ben's brand, including its visual brand identity, which we will do," a company spokesperson told the New York Times. And evolve they did—the same products can now be found under the name Ben's Original.

5

Conagra Brands

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Similarly, Conagra Brands announced they would be reviewing the complete branding and packaging of Mrs. Butterworth's products. The shape of their syrup bottles is an allusion to a "mammy", a racist representation of black servanthood.

And for more, check out these 108 most popular sodas ranked by how toxic they are.

Mura Dominko
Mura is a Deputy Editor leading ETNT's coverage of America's favorite fast foods and restaurant chains. Read more