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Healthy Pesto-Topped Grilled Swordfish Steak Recipe

Between the burst of tomato sweetness that joins forces with the garlicky punch of the pesto, this dish is simply next level.
Healthy Pesto-Topped Grilled Swordfish Steak RecipeMitch Mandel and Thomas MacDonald

No fridge should be without a bottle of premade pesto. It pairs perfectly with pasta, of course, but also works as an excellent sandwich spread, salad dressing enhancer, and instant marinade. This recipe takes the latter tack, slathering meaty swordfish steaks in pesto before grilling, then topping them with quick-sautéed tomatoes. The burst of sweetness from the tomatoes joins forces with the garlicky punch of the pesto, making for a swordfish steak recipe that tastes every bit the creation of a restaurant chef.

Nutrition: 250 calories, 13 g fat (3 g saturated), 390 mg sodium

Serves 4

You’ll Need

2 Tbsp bottled pesto
4 swordfish steaks (4–6 oz each)
1  Tbsp olive oil
2  cloves garlic, peeled and lightly crushed
2 cups cherry tomatoes
Salt and black pepper to taste

How to Make It

  1. Spread the pesto all over the swordfish steaks, cover, and marinate in the fridge for 30 minutes.
  2. While the fish marinates, heat the olive oil in a sauté pan over medium heat.
  3. Add the garlic and cook for a minute or two, until lightly browned.
  4. Add the tomatoes and sauté until the skins are lightly blistered and about to pop, about 5 minutes.
  5. Season with salt and pepper.
  6. Preheat a grill or grill pan.
  7. Season the fish all over with salt and pepper.
  8. When the grill is hot, cook the swordfish for 4 to 5 minutes per side, until the fish is cooked all the way through and the flesh flakes with gentle pressure.
  9. Reheat the tomatoes and top each steak with a scoop.

Eat This Tip

Greater Grains and Pesto Preferences

American eating traditions dictate that every home cooked meal come with a starch, which usually means potatoes or rice, neither of which add much to a meal other than empty carbs. But a new class of global grains has flooded the market that can boost nutrition and cut calories. Quinoa, from South America, is our favorite, but also try amaranth, couscous, bulgar, and farro. All are excellent high-fiber rice and potato alternatives.

And while we’re at it, let’s talk about the different pesto possibilities! Dig the alteration? Traditional pesto is made with a base of basil, pine nuts, and parmesan cheese, but there are lots of equally yummy options. We recommend Trader Joe’s Kale Cashew Pesto. It’s relish and vegan too!

This recipe (and hundreds more!) came from one of our Cook This, Not That! books. For more easy cooking ideas, you can also buy the book!

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