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The Unhealthiest Chicken Noodle Soup on Shelves

Some canned options are just better left in the store, nowhere near your kitchen pantry.
chicken noodle soup

There really is no comfort soup quite like chicken noodle. Whether you're feeling under the weather, just want to feel all warm and cozy on a cold night, or are in the mood to slurp on something that tastes familiar and delicious, a bowl of chicken noodle soup is it. Not everyone has the time (or patience) to make chicken noodle soup from scratch, so that's where the canned stuff comes in. It's not only a cheap pantry item that lasts for a while, but it results in a meal that is ready in minutes. Can't beat that!

But there are some chicken noodle soup cans that are worse for you than others. The problem with canned soups is the amount of sodium they often contain, along with some questionable ingredients. But the sodium is the real issue, as the American Heart Association recommends most adults consume no more than 2,300 milligrams a day, moving toward an ideal limit of no more than 1,500 milligrams.

So to help you make the best choice, we uncovered the unhealthiest chicken noodle soup. We ranked the most commonly found options from the not so bad to the worst of the bunch that you'll find on supermarket shelves, looking mostly at the sodium per can. And while you're making healthier changes, why not try out any of the 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time?

10

Healthy Choice Chicken Noodle

healthy choice chicken soup

Per can: 180 calories, 4 g fat (1 g saturated fat), 780 mg sodium, 24 g carbs (2 g fiber, 4 g sugar), 14 g protein

While we would like to see no sugar in this soup, overall, it's pretty low in fat and sodium, and high in protein. The list of ingredients isn't as clean as we would hope, but overall, Healthy Choice Chicken Noodle isn't all that bad. If you stick to the serving size and split this can, you'll be consuming just 390 milligrams of sodium.

9

Health Valley Organic Chicken Noodle Soup

health valley chicken noodle soup

Per can: 140 calories, 4 g fat (1 g saturated fat), 830 mg sodium, 20 g carbs (2 g fiber, 2 g sugar), 9 g protein

Taking one look at the ingredients of Health Valley's chicken noodle soup and you'll see water, carrots, chicken, and celery are listed first. A major plus! There is also a strong serving of protein and vitamin A in this soup, too.

Looking for more helpful tips? Your ultimate restaurant and supermarket survival guide is here!

8

Pacific Foods Organic Chicken Noodle Soup

pacific food chicken noodle soup

Per container: 160 calories, 2 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat), 890 mg sodium, 24 g carbs (3 g fiber, 2 g sugar), 10 g protein

This chicken soup option from Pacific Foods is serving up some fiber and protein, which gives it major points. The ingredients list is rather short compared to others on this list, too.

7

365 Everyday Value Organic Chicken Noodle Soup

365 chicken soup

Per container: 140 calories, 0 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 1,040 mg sodium, 20 g carbs (2 g fiber, 0 g sugar), 16 g protein

While the sodium here is still far too high, 365 Everyday Value's soup does offer up a solid serving of protein and vitamin A.

6

Annie's Organic Chicken Noodle Soup

annies chicken noodle soup

Per can: 140 calories, 3.5 g fat (1 g saturated fat), 950 mg sodium, 16 g carbs (1 g fiber, 2 g sugar), 9 g protein

The downside with this soup from Annie's? Well, besides the high sodium count is the lack of fiber. One whole can is only serving up 1 gram, and fiber not only helps your digestive system, but help you feel fuller, longer.

5

Amy's Soups No Chicken Noodle

amys soup chicken noodle

Per can: 180 calories, 6 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat), 1,080 mg sodium, 22 g carbs (3 g fiber, 5 g sugar), 9 g protein

If you're following a vegetarian diet and still want to enjoy chicken noodle soup, this option from Amy's is your best bet, as it has tofu. So this means it's not lacking in protein, either. But again, the sodium will make you stop right in your tracks. One can of this soup sets you back more than 1,000 milligrams, or as much sodium as you would get if you ate six small orders of McDonald's French fries.

4

Lipton Extra Noodle

lipton extra noodle soup

Per packet: 80 calories, 1.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 660 mg sodium, 15 g carbs (< 1 g fiber, < 1 g sugar), 3 g protein

If you're feeling extra hungry, going for a packet of Lipton's Extra Noodle seems like an ideal option. What you'll find, though, is a soup that has a super long list of processed ingredients and more sodium than three bag's of Lay's potato chips.

3

Progresso Chicken Noodle

Per can: 230 calories, 6 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 1,510 mg sodium, 29 g carbs (2 g fiber, 3 g sugar), 15 g protein

Progresso's soup is free of any artificial flavors, and it's a decent protein serving. But again, the sodium isn't ideal, as it's packing more of the salty stuff than you would get if you ate 15 pretzel rods.

2

Wolfgang Puck Organic Free Range Chicken Noodle

wolfgang puck chicken soup

Per can: 170 calories, 5 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 1,420 mg sodium, 23 g carbs (1 g fiber, 2 g sugar), 7 g protein

A can of this soup doesn't look all that bad at first glance, but the sodium is still high. There's more sodium here than if you ate six small order of Wendy's fries. There are better options out there!

1

Campbell's Chunky Creamy Chicken Noodle

campbells chunky creamy chicken noodle soup

Per can: 480 calories, 31 g fat (13 g saturated fat), 1,720 mg sodium, 36 g carbs (3 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 15 g protein

When it comes to which soup is better left on the shelf, that title goes to none other than Campbell's Chunky Creamy Chicken Noodle. We will praise the high protein content, as 15 grams per can is rather solid. That all quickly goes out the window, though, seeing the amount of calories, fat, saturated, and sodium content. They're all simply troublesome. The Classic Chicken Noodle version of this soup isn't much better on the sodium front either, as one can is packing 1,700 milligrams.

Jennifer Maldonado
Jennifer Maldonado is a senior editor at Eat This, Not That!, specializing in food and health content. Read more
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