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The Surprising Drinks This Woman Had Every Day To Live Until 112

Cheers to that!

It seems like the more and more people who live until 100, the more we discover the different and unique secrets that led them on this aging path. One major discovery is that keeping up with habits will help you live longer. This includes eating or drinking the same things every day, whether they be healthy or unhealthy.

Agnes Fenton, a late New Jersey resident, drank a combination of surprising beverages that were believed to help her live a long, fulfilling life until she was 112. According to Northjersey.com, Fenton drank three beers and a shot of whiskey daily.

The article continues to tell that in 1943, Fenton's doctor gave her the unusual prescription of alcohol for a benign tumor. This prescription was what got her into the habit of drinking three Miller High Life beers, topping off with a shot of Johnnie Walker Blue Label whiskey.

Born Agnes Jones, Fenton came from Mississippi. She moved to Tennessee before settling down in Englewood, New Jersey in the 1950s. She kept her unusual drinking habit up for decades until the last few years because she began to eat less and was limited to a wheelchair, also being looked after by nurses.

According to an article posted by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, a moderate intake of spirits such as whiskey, which is about 1 and a half ounces, may help prevent ischemic strokes caused by clots. It also can help lower the risk of other cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and peripheral vascular disease. Plus, it may help lower the risk of cardiac death.

In a study posted in the JAMA Journal, consumption of 1 to 6 drinks weekly is associated with a lower risk of incident dementia among older adults compared to those who did not drink. Although Fenton exceeded that intake, she sure made that habit last for decades.

When it comes to beer specifically, beer contains bioavailable silicon. According to the International Journal of Endocrinology, silicon is a requirement in bone formation for those who lack vitamin D. The study found that moderate consumption of products with silicon in it, such as beer, increased bone density in men.

Pint of beer and whiskey shot
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Along with Fenton's passion for drinking, she also had a calling for food. As a young lady, she opened The Pals Duck Inn in Memphis, TN, becoming one of the first African-American women to own a restaurant in the state.

Members of St. Mark's Church (where Fenton remained an active member), her neighbors, firefighters, and friends, always looked after her. They all say she always remained keen, even after she stopped her drinking habit.

Specifically, Lamont Saunders of Teaneck was closely associated with Fenton, as he would refer to her as, "Aunt Aggie." In the Northjersey article, Saunders mentions that Fenton remained sharp up to the end. He says she never lost sight of who she was. She was able to recall any part of her life in detail.

RELATED: The #1 Drink The World's Oldest Woman Has Every Day

Kayla Garritano
Kayla Garritano is a Staff Writer for Eat This, Not That! She graduated from Hofstra University, where she majored in Journalism and double minored in Marketing and Creative Writing. Read more