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The #1 Unhealthiest Order at LongHorn Steakhouse, According to a Dietitian

Discover the surprising dish you should avoid at LongHorn Steakhouse and learn what to order instead.
FACT CHECKED BY Olivia Tarantino

With over 600 locations across the country, LongHorn Steakhouse is a beloved restaurant chain known for its affordable steaks and satisfying offerings. From indulgent starters like the Texas Tonion and Firecracker Chicken Wraps to hearty mains like Cowboy Pork Chops and Redrock Grilled Shrimp, there's something to suit everyone's tastes at this steakhouse—even if they're not in the mood for beef.

While their famous steaks may capture your attention as you peruse the menu, it's crucial to recognize that not all choices on the LongHorn menu align with health-conscious dining. It may be common knowledge that a fatty cut of steak may not be the healthiest option, but do you know just how bad some of the offerings at LongHorn can be?

For this article, we analyzed the nutritional data of the entire LongHorn Steakhouse menu to pinpoint the number one unhealthiest order. Our goal is to help you make smarter choices while dining out, so we also picked out an alternative steak order that could better suit your health goals.

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The #1 Unhealthiest Order at LongHorn Steakhouse: LongHorn Porterhouse

Porterhouse steak on the grill
LongHorn Steakhouse
Nutrition (per 22 oz serving):
Calories: 1,280
Fat: 67 g (Saturated Fat: 27 g)
Sodium: 2,450 mg
Carbs: 1 g (Fiber: 2 g, Sugar: 1 g)
Protein: 150 g

The LongHorn Porterhouse, tipping the scales at a hefty 22 ounces, is the biggest steak on LongHorn's menu. This steak cut combines a bone-in strip with a generous amount of filet. The porterhouse cut comes from the loin of the cow and is the area below the backbone, where some of the most tender and popular cuts of beef can be found.

Despite its appeal, the Porterhouse presents a notable issue: its massive size. A recommended serving of beef is between 3 to 4 ounces when cooked. At 22 ounces, even with the bone-in aspect considered, this steak exceeds sensible portion sizes.

Porterhouse is also notoriously a marbled cut, so it carries a lot of fat—in this case, 135% of the recommended daily max of artery-clogging saturated fat. Its sodium content also surpasses daily guidelines, hitting 110% of the recommended intake.

And while that 150 grams of protein may look impressive, unfortunately, your body likely won't reap all the benefits. The body's optimal protein absorption typically ranges from 25 to 30 grams per meal, so this protein overload is more than what your body can utilize at one time.

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Eat This Instead: Renegade Sirloin (6 ounces)

LongHorn Steakhouse Renegade Sirloin
Longhorn Steakhouse
Nutrition (Per 6 oz serving):
Calories: 320
Fat: 15 g (Saturated Fat: 5 g)
Sodium: 530 mg
Carbs: 2 g (Fiber: 0 g, Sugar: 0 g)
Protein: 36 g

It's time to say goodbye to '80s dining habits—your plate should not consist of one huge 22-ounce steak! Swap the Porterhouse out for a satisfying 6-ounce portion of sirloin steak (even the 9-ounce Renegade Sirloin menu option is better than the Porterhouse).

For a well-balanced plate, fill half with fruits and/or veggies, one quarter with starches, and the remaining quarter with protein. Opt for lower-calorie, healthier sides such as broccoli, steamed asparagus, or a salad to balance out your meal. Steer clear of high-calorie and saturated fat-laden options like fries and macaroni and cheese, and consider splitting a baked potato with a tablemate (a full potato alongside a steak is just too much).

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Toby Amidor, MS, RD, CDN
Toby Amidor is an award winning dietitian and Wall Street Journal best-selling cookbook author who believes healthy and wholesome can also be appetizing and delicious. Read more about Toby