How The Sugar Industry Used Fat As Its Scapegoat

For years, we blamed dietary fat for our expanding love handles and poor heart health. But as it turns out, sugar is the root of all our problems—and the sugar industry has been covering it up for decades.

How The Sugar Industry Used Fat As Its Scapegoat

For years, we blamed dietary fat for our expanding love handles and poor heart health. But as it turns out, sugar is the root of all our problems—and the sugar industry has been covering it up for decades.

New reports outlining the dangers of sugar and sugary foods are coming into the spotlight each week. According to recent findings, the carbohydrate has been linked to everything from weight gain and obesity to cancer and diabetes—and we all need to be eating far less of it. But have you ever stopped to think about why this information is just becoming public knowledge? If so, you’re not alone. Recently, three researchers from the University of California at San Francisco decided to do some digging into the sugar industry’s shady past. After analyzing the Sugar Research Foundation’s internal documents, historical reports, and statements from the 1950s, the truth was undeniable: The Sugar Association knew that sugar could cause coronary heart disease but failed to disclose the truth. Instead, they sponsored a research program throughout the 1960’s and 70’s that downplayed the hazards of sucrose while highlighting fat as the dietary culprit of heart disease. Simply put, they paid scientists to use dietary fat as a scapegoat.

These skewed findings are responsible for the low-fat trend that defined dieting in the 80’s—a trend, that, in turn, caused the obesity rates in our nation to soar in the following decades. When you remove fat from food, you have to replace it with something to make up for the lack of flavor. And more often than not, food companies replace fat with sugar. The problem is that the sweet stuff doesn’t have any of the satiating benefits of fat, which ultimately causes you to eat more—and get fat and sick over time. To make matters worse, when you’re following a low-fat diet, you’re missing out on healthy fats like avocado, nuts, and extra virgin olive oil, which are actually super heart-healthy and slimming. In fact, people whose diets are rich in added sugars are far more likely to develop heart disease than those who consume diets high in saturated fats, according to a 2015 report in the journal Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases.

Although we can’t undo the damage caused by the Sugar Association’s cherry-picked reports, these newfound revelations can help us prevent future sugar-induced health complications. A diet low in added sugar not only helps reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer, and numerous other diseases, it can also help you boost your metabolism and lose weight. But it can be difficult to know where to start. In his new book, Zero Sugar Diet, co-founder of Eat This, Not That! and bestselling author David Zinczenko explains how it’s possible to spot the added sugars in our daily meals and substitute those for whole foods that can better your health. To learn more about how to curb your sweet tooth cravings, pre-order Zero Sugar Diet today!