News

Your Day in Health: July 6

Panera is making another big change to their menu. Find out what they're cutting this time, and more of your daily health news.

News

Your Day in Health: July 6

Panera is making another big change to their menu. Find out what they're cutting this time, and more of your daily health news.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

GOT A SWEET TOOTH? Indulge in moderation and then cleanse your palate with a mint to ward off cravings for seconds.

NY TIMES: Panera’s Mission To Be Anything But Artificial

"Nonetheless, Panera has a history of pushing suppliers out of their comfort zone. And now Panera has set its sights on something else that Mr. Kish didn’t use in his grandmother’s kitchen: high-fructose corn syrup. Panera has removed high-fructose corn syrup, a cheap and ubiquitous sweetener, from its salad dressings and most pastries. Next, Mr. Kish says, Panera will stop serving soda that includes the syrup. And if that means severing the company’s relationship with PepsiCo, which provides Panera’s soda fountains, so be it." Read the full story.

SCIENCE DAILY: Offering Healthier Options At Carryout Stores Improves Bottom Line

"A pilot program designed to encourage mom and pop carryout shops in Baltimore to promote and sell healthier menu items not only improved eating habits, but also increased the stores' gross revenue by an average 25 percent, new research found." Read the full story.

SCIENCE DAILY: Epidemic Of Obesity, Overweight Linked To Increased Food Supply

"This study investigates the associations between changes in national food energy supply and average population body weight in 24 high-, 27 middle- and 18 low-income countries. The authors found that the association between change in energy supply and change in weight was statistically significant overall, with findings suggesting that increases in food energy supply are sufficient to explain increases in average population weight." Read the full story.

NPR: When The Fish You Eat Have Eaten Something Toxic

"Toxins produced by algae that live in warm ocean waters can pass up the fish food chain. The toxins can sicken humans who eat large fish. A Florida study finds cases are underreported." Read the full story.