News

10 Things Personal Trainers Won’t Tell You

Things your trainer isn't saying, how your family is making you gain weight and more.

10 Things Personal Trainers Won’t Tell You
News

10 Things Personal Trainers Won’t Tell You

Things your trainer isn't saying, how your family is making you gain weight and more.

Your Healthy Tip for the Day

Diet soda has zero calories, so it must be better for you than regular cola, right? That assumption has been blown apart by a wave of recent scientific studies. The Eat This, Not That!-approved pick is sparkling water spiked with a little bit of natural juice with no added sugar. For a bigger weight loss boost, try replacing your soda with tea. Here's all you need to know about green tea and weight loss. Hint: those two go hand in hand.

WSJ: 10 Things Personal Trainers Won’t Tell You

"About 6.5 million Americans use personal trainers, according to the International Health Racquet and Sportsclub Association. And the number of trainers is expected to grow about 13%, to more than 300,000, between now and 2022, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as the boomer population ages and employers and insurers take more steps to combat obesity. The best trainers excel at introducing sedentary clients to basic exercise activities, and in getting more experienced ones to try new exercises, eliminate inefficient ones or perform better. Where they often fall short is in getting clients to make changes to lifestyle and diet that complement the work they’re doing at the gym. 'The industry has created a model that doesn’t work for 99% of people,' said Anthony Wall, a personal-trainer instructor and the director of professional education for the American Council on Exercise, an industry trade group." Click here to read the full story.

SCIENCE DAILY: Family Critisizing Your Weight? You Might Add More Pounds

"Women whose loved ones are critical of their weight tend to put on even more pounds, says a new study on the way people's comments affect our health. 'When we feel bad about our bodies, we often turn to loved ones—families, friends and romantic partners—for support and advice. How they respond can have a bigger effect than we might think,' said one author." Click here to read the full story.

WSJ: Capturing A High-Fiber Diet’s Curbs On Appetite

"A high-fiber diet sets off a biological mechanism that reduces hunger pangs and helps keep pounds off. But people can only comfortably eat so much fiber. So is there any way to ramp up that mechanism without consuming sacks of oat bran every day? Scientists in the U.K. say that they have found one: a potential food additive that can make meals more filling. The researchers focused on a naturally occurring substance called propionate, produced when fiber ferments in the gut. Propionate stimulates the release of hormones that signal the brain to reduce hunger, and the researchers wanted to see if giving volunteers high doses would magnify the effect." Click here to read the full story.

REUTERS: Activity Trackers Get Smarter At Measuring Fitness

"Fitness activity trackers have come a long way since Leonardo da Vinci sketched a rudimentary gear-and-pendulum pedometer to track the treks of 15th century Roman soldiers. Today’s devices count calories, measure sleep patterns and monitor heart rates as well as steps. Fitness experts predict their popularity and usefulness will grow as they become more sophisticated." Click here to read the full story.